Bulldog Breeds Forums banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone. I am not new to this site, but havent posted in a while. Some of you may know that we live in Germany and have an American Staffordshire Terrier named Dusty Rose. She is now 14 months old and has been great except for a few nerve racking problems. One is, she always begs for food while we are at the table eating. We have tried everything to break her of this but she is not giving an inch. The most alarming thing lately is this, my son likes to crawl in her bed and cuddle with her at times. Well, in this past week, she has growled at my son for getting in her bed with her, and today my wife said she snapped at him and almost got his lips and face. Here is one thing that I am wondering may come into affect with this. He is sometimes how would I put it, not mean in a way that he does it on purpose, but more by playing as expected from a 2 year old kid. He will run by her and smack her on the back or head and then grab her like he wants to wrestle etc. Most of the time, she is playful back with him and doesnt mind how rough he is. We have her on a shot that makes her not have her cycle and it is given every 6 months. It is almost time for her second one and I am thinking that her hormones are going nuts right about now and could be the reason for her aggression. She gets plenty of love and exercise from us. We want to get her the second shot for the year and then have her fixed. I just worry if this is a sign of aggression and will it get worse. If so she will have to go. I will not put my son at the risk of being attacked by her. I hate to put it this way, but if she hurt a hair on my son, she will parish very quickly. I am old fashioned and would not tolerate it. Cant put it any other way. We love her like a child, and she has been so wonderful up to now. It is breaking our hearts and we need some advice. Everyone here has always been so helpful even through all the drama. Please contact me somehow or post some comments to this thread and give us some advice.

As far as our American Bulldog, no problems what so ever. He is 17 weeks old now and is the biggest cuddle bug you could ever see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
I agree that this behavior is very worrisome. First off - you MUST restrict your son from access to the dog's bed, and probably restrict their interactions to VERY supervised situations. Use baby gates or whatever to keep him with you and away from her unless you and/or your wife can be RIGHT THERE with them and doing NOTHING else (no distractions!). 2 years old is simply far too young for your son to (a) understand how to act around the dog and (b) reliably act properly - he may "get it" when you're right there explaining how to pet gently, but kids that young just don't retain the information! Also, from a dog's perspective, children do not act like "people" - they move erratically, they make odd noises, and in general act like wounded prey. That's not to excuse the behavior, but in order to train, you have to see the world how she sees it.

It is possible that the hormones are influencing your dog's reactions. It's also possible that she's not feeling quite well. Bully dogs are generally quite stoic and may not show that they're in pain, but if you son suddenly touches or bumps a sore area, she might react to the pain. You should check out this possibility with your vet.

Finally - the begging is pretty easy (comparitively). If she has a crate, then crate her with a nice stuffed Kong or other chew toy during dinner. If no crate, put her in a down/stay a good 5-10 feet from the table (maybe just outside the kitchen or along the dining room wall, depending on where you eat). If she doesn't know down/stay, now is as good a time as any to start teaching her. In the meantime, you can tether her to the leg of a good-sized sofa (again, with a stuffed Kong or chewie to keep her occupied). If none of these is possible, she gets "shunned" during dinner - basically, no one looks at her, speaks to her, touches her in any way. It will take a while, but eventually she'll give up. If part of the problem is dropped food (and with a 2 year old, that's a big possibility), then she MUST be restricted away from where you're eating - in a crate, behind a baby gate, whatever.

Hope this is helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
586 Posts
hey, first off this sucks, but I think it's time to put up a post at the Post Office for Dusty to go to a family with bigger kids Or no kids. I would hate to hear that your baby got bit.

Dogs are FEW AND FAR BETWEEN here, not sure what's they are like at Ramstein, but if you want to adopt her out, send a pic and description to me and I'll post it here at Spang for you too.

Terrible situation, but better to say goodbye sadly to her now than haveing to Euthanize her because she has scarred your child for life.

Good luck and let us know what you decide.

Bridget
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Ok your post says a lot

One is, she always begs for food while we are at the table eating
If you can't break that then you have a problem. That right there tells me you have a dog that is not submissive. A submissive dog will never beg for food. A submissive dog eats after the alpha dogs.

She is dominating everyone in your family. This is something that can become very dangerous for everyone in the family.


These are my suggestions

-Start NILIF(Nothing in Life is Free)

-Do not feed your dog until you have properly exercised her. This does not mean running around the backyard. This means a good 45 minute walk with the dog following you not the other way around.

-Do not provide water all day long on her schedule. Provide water throughout the day as you see fit and allow her to have water.

-When providing food require her to do some sort of obediance to get the food. My dogs are required to lay down and relax prior to getting food and they are only allowed to move towards the food after I tell them they can. I can honestly put down the food and walk away for 10 minutes and Lucy will lay in the same spot until I tell her to eat the food.

-When putting the food in the bowl mix it with your hands. This gets your scent on the food.

-Pick up all the toys and only give toys when she is being good and shows some submissive behavior.


In the end, 99.9% of dogs do not want to be in control of the house but if you do not show them that you run the house, they will take over. These are some extremely simple things you can do to eliminate the problem with 95% of the dogs out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,658 Posts
This is easily fixed. Why are you allowing your son to hit the dog in the back of the head? Why do you allow him to act roughly with the dog? The dog shouldn't be blamed for this. It's probably fed up with being hit and whatnot. I'm not condoning the snapping, but it's understandable. Just as you would protect your son, you should be protecting your dog, and teaching your son at a young age that it is NOT acceptable to treat a dog like this. So many people expect their dogs to tolerate so much from young children. Dogs don't understand age. If they are constantly getting "bullied" they are gonna get fed up. Teach your son to be nicer with the dog, and monitor at all times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,120 Posts
jleonar said:
Ok your post says a lot

One is, she always begs for food while we are at the table eating
If you can't break that then you have a problem. That right there tells me you have a dog that is not submissive. A submissive dog will never beg for food. A submissive dog eats after the alpha dogs.

She is dominating everyone in your family. This is something that can become very dangerous for everyone in the family.


These are my suggestions

-Start NILIF(Nothing in Life is Free)

-Do not feed your dog until you have properly exercised her. This does not mean running around the backyard. This means a good 45 minute walk with the dog following you not the other way around.

-Do not provide water all day long on her schedule. Provide water throughout the day as you see fit and allow her to have water.

-When providing food require her to do some sort of obediance to get the food. My dogs are required to lay down and relax prior to getting food and they are only allowed to move towards the food after I tell them they can. I can honestly put down the food and walk away for 10 minutes and Lucy will lay in the same spot until I tell her to eat the food.

-When putting the food in the bowl mix it with your hands. This gets your scent on the food.

-Pick up all the toys and only give toys when she is being good and shows some submissive behavior.


In the end, 99.9% of dogs do not want to be in control of the house but if you do not show them that you run the house, they will take over. These are some extremely simple things you can do to eliminate the problem with 95% of the dogs out there.
What she said. This could become a horrible situation.Some training is in order. This dog should not dominate your household. I hope a crate is used to seperate your son form your dog.

And if your not willing to do the time I do hope rehoming is your second choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,272 Posts
hmm, i gotta wonder why you expect your dog to respect your son and not your son to respect the dog. i would also suggest some training, for you, not the dog. i think the best thing you could do for this dog is rehome her.
and i am being nice here
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,493 Posts
Most don't want to hear my comments on dogs showing aggression to humans, but what I will say is that a dog like this should NEVER EVER just be dumped into another home. Rehoming an animal doesn't fix the problem & usually results in someone in the new home getting bitten. Not worth it. There's a better end than doing that to the dog and unsuspecting people trying to help give the dog a home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
594 Posts
Miakoda said:
Most don't want to hear my comments on dogs showing aggression to humans, but what I will say is that a dog like this should NEVER EVER just be dumped into another home. Rehoming an animal doesn't fix the problem & usually results in someone in the new home getting bitten. Not worth it. There's a better end than doing that to the dog and unsuspecting people trying to help give the dog a home.
I agree. I think if the probelm can't be fixed in the home he is in it can't be fixed. Consider euthanasia. JMHO I just think that it is an accident wating to happen and giving it up to another home is handing a loaded gun to an unknowing person. Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,666 Posts
firast , you bettter teach your son it is NEVER alright to hit the dog, Secound you need to teach your son never go into the dogs bed, your dog needs a plce of his own, thats a safe place to get away from your kid. If you can't him to stay away from the dogs bed, get a create, that wasy the pup wil have a safe zone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
Kids

First off i am not trying to be wise by any means. but i have 3 kids they all grew up with dogs and they were young to same age But they were never allowed to smack a dog not even playing. They had to respect the animals here and be gentle patting etc. I never had a problem. A child doing this even in a playful way is not good. dogs will get fed up and they also need space. This can also teach a dog not to like children and see them in another light which is not good especailly with a staffy. Where this has already been going on the damage may already be done. He may not be able to be around children and may not be able to be trusted around children due to this and this makes for a dangerous situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,658 Posts
Erica said:
#-o #-o Issues...all kinds of issues..I am stayin out of this..
I agree! I don't see anything wrong with rehoming this dog. If you can't get your kid to respect the dog (which he should by all means no matter how old he is) then give the dog to someone who deserves it. Doesn't sound like it's an aggressive dog, just fed up of being pushed around, and i can't say i blame him!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
This Can Work

I have a 2 year old Pit Bull and a 2 year old son. They respect each others stuff. Although the difference is they love each other and share everything like they were brothers. Your son can be taught to respect your dog. and your dog can be taught to respect your son. First off you have to get the begging under control. You become dominant over your dog right now. or you will have to have her put down. I trained Carter with the clicker. But first she must know your alpha. Make her submissive. Put her on her back laying down and bend down so you are kinda on top of her. You control the situation not her. When she undstands that you are alpha, then have your wife do the same thing, and then one of you be by the dog while she's on her back and get your son in there next. But most importantly. Keep that dog out of the kitchen or dinning room while you are eating. And even more importantly, make sure your son knows that the dog bed is her's not his. I would work on that too eventually. I can take anything alway from my pit, whether it be food or toy. You have to work with her. If you can't do this then you have two options and other people told you what you needed to do. Good luck, and if you need anything or have any questions let me know.

Dani
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,604 Posts
I mostly agree with "Attitude" and CC's mom. It seems you are the one in need of training. Food issues aside, you are totally setting yourself up for failure. In my home, everybody (human or canine) has a place they can go if they want to be left alone. Does your dog not deserve this? Since you haven't responded to anyone's post, I'm guessing you have already come to some conclusions yourself. I truly hope they are in everyone's best interest. No dog will be "perfect" , much less without the proper training. OB is great, but worthless if you don't follow up. Be pro-active. Teach your dog, and more importantly , teach your son. Some day, when he's older, say he's taking a walk. He sees a strange dog and wants to pet it. If he doesn't understand dogs, and approaches them wrong, something very serious could happen. Take this opportunity and educate him. It's not just your dog you have to worry about. Sadly, irresponsible owners are everywhere. The dog bite epidemic gets worse every year. If you truly fear for your son's safety, think long-term as well as short-term. Good Luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,671 Posts
Is this the same person who came on the forum a few months ago saying they wanted to breed their AB to their APBT? I may be wrong but "Dusty Rose" rings a bell with me from the breeding section. :-k
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Lisa said:
Is this the same person who came on the forum a few months ago saying they wanted to breed their AB to their APBT? I may be wrong but "Dusty Rose" rings a bell with me from the breeding section. :-k
Yup - the same bell is ringing over here. Don't remember the details of the earlier posts, but I think it's the same family.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,279 Posts
Chynasmom said:
Lisa said:
Is this the same person who came on the forum a few months ago saying they wanted to breed their AB to their APBT? I may be wrong but "Dusty Rose" rings a bell with me from the breeding section. :-k
Yup - the same bell is ringing over here. Don't remember the details of the earlier posts, but I think it's the same family.
If you go into profile under there name it will take you to a page about this person and on this page it has " See posts made by this person" click on it and it will show you all the post that this person has made and under what subject as well.
You should find out here if this is in fact the same person.
 

·
Agent Squint
Joined
·
4,225 Posts
Poor doggie...i'm teaching my 14mth old son to show respect to Roxy, he already knows how to stroke and kiss her :)

Best start working on the child so the AB doesnt turn the same way.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top