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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saturday we went to Mike Connors home and did some YAHOOOOO! Rumble has been out of commission for the past 3.5 weeks. This was Rumble’s first day back at work.

Megan was wearing the “Russian Bit Suit” and did some good work decoying for “Bandit” and “Sully”. Megan is also doing some “yard work” with her Malinois ‘Booyeah”.

Mike was NUTS as usual! He is always willing to safely decoy in any situation we throw at him. We had a blast and couldn’t fit all the video in one movie! These are the Yahooooo highlights. I can make another video of the conventional training if anyone wants to see it. Just let us know!

Constructive comments are always welcome!

http://www.madmaine.com/mikeshouse/

Safe training,
Chris Fraize
 

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I love these videos. Is there anything that throws Rumbles concentration? Why was he out?

The trampoline work looks dangerous. With the decoy jumping it looked close to a face bite in one of those. Do the dogs know better or is it as dangerous as it looks?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great questions!

Hello,

Rumble was out with a pretty deep laceration he received when running through the woods and got mixed up in some barbed wire from an old farm fence. He was out for 3 weeks and IT WAS MURDER KEEPING HIM CALM!

There are MANY things that break Rumbles concentration! That is why we keep seeking them out and training (proofing) around them!

Rumble is pretty fixated on the equipment so Mike is no real danger. However accidents do happen and all players know the risks. The dogs are trained not mean. So, they are just playing a game. They know the "rules" and (for the most part) follow them. I remember back to when I first started to see bite work. I was always asking why people did things and aren't they going to get hurt. After a while all the information starts to connect and make sense and you see things thru the dogs eyes and realize there isn't much to be afraid of in bite work when it's done correctly!

Thanks for the comments!
Here is another video from the same day (Last Saturday). I posted it on U TUBE so even dial up folks can see it now!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObKIclKnhgc

Safe training,
Chris Fraize
 

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Oh, I did not intend to sound like your dogs are trained to be mean. They clearly have an understanding that they are working and at your command. The trampoline shot just looked dangerous cause it looked like the decoy was on the downward end of the jump when one of the dogs made it onto the tramp. It was close to a face to face meeting.

I actually think it would be exciting to be a decoy, especially with the dogs in your video. They got to be on a nice adrenaline rush!
 

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This might be a stupid question, so forgive me if it is. :oops: In the beginning of that first video, when you're (or whoever it is) sitting on the barrel with the guy behind you...do you have to give a command to get the dog to bite him, or does he automatically bite when the decoy places his hand on you?
 

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Leeann.Bella.Remy said:
This might be a stupid question, so forgive me if it is. :oops: In the beginning of that first video, when you're (or whoever it is) sitting on the barrel with the guy behind you...do you have to give a command to get the dog to bite him, or does he automatically bite when the decoy places his hand on you?

i would guess a command, the dog should absolutely not attack without a command correct? Thats the whole purpose to show the dogs training....just guessing though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Defense of handler

Great question and observation!

The Belgian ring the defense of handler exercise calls for the dog to bite when the handler is touched. The dog is still being cued from a signal but the signal is non-verbal. The dog (trained properly) understands a certain set of visual cues like the seated handler, the decoy sneaking up from behind and understands when the bite is allowed to happen.

The dog (again trained properly) understands that this is only to occur on the field and won’t offer this behavior off of the field.

Safe training,
Chris Fraize
 
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