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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OMG! My neighbors have this avacado tree that keeps dropping avacados in my yard. It is too tall to reach them to clear the tree, so they fall. First thing when I let these dogs out, they run straite to the avacados on the graound and start gulping them. ALWAYS!!!
Cato can pick up an avacado and with one smooth swift move, peel the fruit off the pit and spit the pit. Chocy has to chew and make a mes, and Daizy just picks it up and insists on carrying it inside so I take it from her.
As soon as we pick them up, they are back, a ton more fall!

My dogs eat proyy close to 10 a day before I can get out there each time to get them, and as soon as I clear them and turn around more fall and they grab them and run!

Cato is pooing avacado!EW!

But, at least we know, avacados are not poisonour to dogs!

I swear they are vegetarians!!!Lol.....
 

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I dont know, i'm not saying they are or they are not. I just thought i would post it incase anyone else was thinking they were ok to feed and ended up with sick dogs.

My guess would be that some of the problems stated above by feeding them would take a while before you started to see the effects.

As i said i'm not saying you should or shouldn't let your dogs eat these things, but personally i wouldn't let my dog.
 

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Dont know if this will be of any help to anyone or not :D

Common Foods That Are Harmful Or Even Fatal to Dogs
Many common foods are actually harmful or even fatal to dogs. Some of these (listed below) will surprise you. Others are things you would never give your dog purposefuly, but now you will be more careful to not let them be in your dog's reach. And some just need to be limited to small amounts.

Avocadoes (fruit, pit, and plant) are toxic to dogs. They can cause difficulty breathing; fluid accumulation in the chest, abdomen and heart; or pancreatitis.

Onions destroy red blood cells and can cause anemia, weakness, and breathing difficulty. Even small amounts can cause cumulative damage over time. This includes onions or chives - raw, powdered, dehydrated, or cooked.

Large amounts of garlic cause the same problems as onions.

Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure in dogs. As little as a single serving of raisins can kill him. If the dog doesn't eat enough at one time to be fatal, he can be severely damaged by eating just a few grapes or raisins regularly.

Tomatoes can cause tremors and heart arrhythmias. Tomato plants and the most toxic, but tomatoes themselves are also unsafe. (All parts of the plant except the tomato itself are also poisonous to humans.)

Nutmeg can cause tremors, seizures and death.

Caffeine (from coffee, coffee grounds, tea, or tea bags) stimulates the central nervous and cardiac systems, and can cause vomiting, restlessness, heart palpitations, and even death within hours.

Diet products containing the sweetener Xylitol can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar, resulting in depression, loss of coordination and seizures. Unless treatment is given quickly, the dog could die.

Macadamia nuts can cause weakness, muscle tremor and paralysis. These symptoms are ususally temporary.

Walnuts are poisonous to dogs.

Chocolate can cause seizures, coma and death. Baker’s chocolate is the most dangerous. The darker the chocolate, the more dangerous it is. But any chocolate, in large enough amounts, can kill a dog. An ounce of chocolate can poison a 30-pound dog, and many dogs will happily consume more than this. The symptoms may not show up for several hours (and so might make you think all is well), with death following within twenty-four hours. A dog can consume milk chocolate and appear to be fine because it is not as concentrated, but it is still dangerous.

Avocadoes (fruit, pit, and plant) are toxic to dogs. They can cause difficulty breathing; fluid accumulation in the chest, abdomen and heart; or pancreatitis.

Apple seeds, cherry pits, and peach pits, pear pips, plums pits, peaches, and apricot pits contain cyanide, which is poisonous.

Too much salt can cause kidney problems. Also, large breeds of dogs that eat salty food may then drink too much water and develop bloat, which is fatal unless emergency treatment is given very quickly.

Too much fat or fried foods can cause pancreatitis.

Ham and bacon contain too much fat and too much salt, and can cause pancreatitis. Also, large breeds of dogs that eat salty food may drink too much water and develop a life-threatening condition called bloat. This is where the stomach fills up with gas and within several hours may twist, causing death.

Raw liver or too much cooked liver (three servings a week) can lead to vitamin A toxicity. This can cause deformed bones, excessive bone growth on the elbows and spine, weight loss, and anorexia. Check the label of your canned dog food to be sure that it does not contain liver if you are giving your dog liver also.

Wild mushrooms can cause abdominal pain, drooling, liver damage, kidney damage, vomiting, diarhea, convulsions, coma, or death.

Raw egg whites contain a protein called avidin, which can deplete your dog of biotin, one of the B vitamins. Biotin is essential to your dog’s growth and coat health. The lack of it can cause hair loss, weakness, growth retardation, or skeleton deformity.

Grains should not be given in large amounts or make up a large part of a dog’s diet, but rice is generally safe in small amounts.

Cooked bones can splinter and tear a dog’s internal organs.

Dogs can't digest most vegetables (carrots, green beans, lettuce, potatoes or yams) whole or in large pieces. Potato peels and green potatoes are dangerous.

Dairy products are high in fat, which can cause pancreatitis, gas and diarrhea. A small amount of non-fat, plain yogurt is usually safe.
 

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I've fed garlic, raisins/grapes, tomato products, walnuts, bacon, ham, and every veggie imagined to my 7 pound pomeranian almost everyday for the last 3 years and nothing bad has ever happened to her.

Also Solid Gold makes a dog treat containing Xylitol as a top ingredient because of the tooth health benefits found. Only HUGE amounts at one time are not good, and the two dogs on record that has happened to..neither actually died.

BTW, the avidin within a raw egg white is cancelled out by the yolk. That's why they recommend feeding whole raw eggs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My older dogs have eaten pounds and pounds of chocolate......they were notoriuos for stealing Halloween candy, and would go to any legnths to get it!

Never even puked!

I would never feed them chocolate intentionally, but just a point.
I have also read that there are more dogs that are allergic to peroxide and peanuts then humans.............and when they have a reaction, there is no turning back!!
 

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See. and both my dogs have eaten peanut butter like crazy (and dairy) with no reaction.
It is really the individual dog, my coworker's dogs have eaten bage of halloween chocolate and are still here.
I wouldn't feed chocolate to your dog on purpose, my point is that every dog is different.
 

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my familys springer spaniel, when i was little, got into one of boxes of reese peanut butter cups that we were selling for school, at the whole thing, wrappers and all and threw up around the entire house!

we feed our dogs carrots. we give them a few of the small ones already cut and peeled from the store. never had a problem!
 

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I give my pom a salad almost everyday, no problems.

And my vet recommends green beans so..
 

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I am not trying to cause a fight but fat, smoking, and alcohol will not kill you most of the time the 1st time that you eat,drink, or smoke. Somethings are over time offenders, can you drink excessively for years and build up an immunity to the effects of alcohol, YES!! BUT, all the while you may not feel the effects of the alcohol yet you are destroying your liver. Does some one develope lung cancer after the 1st cig or pack, for that matter, probably not but after the 1st hundred then we are talking a different ball park. It is not the 1st, fat meal that gives us diabetes type 2 it is the effects over time. I realize that I am talking bout dogs but I their physical make up does work similarly to our own, other wise companies would not use them and other animals to run tests on.
 

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As i said in a previous post, i am not saying you must agree with this, but the fact is you have no idea what long term effect you are doing to your dog. Just because he/she may be ok at the moment does not mean that nothing will ever happen or that you are not cutting short the life of your dog/s. As someone else pointed out you can smoke for 20 years and never be ill, yet one day you could feel the effects of it. Nobody doubts that smoking and cancer are related so why is it so impossible for the above to cut your dogs life short ?

I dont care whether you chose to heed the advice above or not, but i my dog will not be fed any of the above just incase. There is obviously some evidence to prove this to be right, if you choose to ignore it that is your choice :D
 

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Bremner53 said:
I just don't understand, why you would keep allowing this to happen? Why take the chance?
Exactly. It could kill your dog....it could not. I think I'd err on the side of caution...but that's just me!
 

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solidstaffs said:
I dont care whether you chose to heed the advice above or not, but i my dog will not be fed any of the above just incase. There is obviously some evidence to prove this to be right, if you choose to ignore it that is your choice :D
Except, do remember that the egg is okay and acutally good for your dog


Our old family dog Cocoa ate 30 chocolate brownies once that I was suppose to take to school. we thought we put them far enough back on the counter.

she was up allllllllllll night, heart racing, ate a raw hide in 20 min (the big ones) and she was not a huge chewer cause normally she would take up to 3 days to eat one, and my dad had to go out and throw the football for her at 4 am. He thought she was going to have a heart attack
 

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Kate said:
solidstaffs said:
I dont care whether you chose to heed the advice above or not, but i my dog will not be fed any of the above just incase. There is obviously some evidence to prove this to be right, if you choose to ignore it that is your choice :D
Except, do remember that the egg is okay and acutally good for your dog


Our old family dog Cocoa ate 30 chocolate brownies once that I was suppose to take to school. we thought we put them far enough back on the counter.

she was up allllllllllll night, heart racing, ate a raw hide in 20 min (the big ones) and she was not a huge chewer cause normally she would take up to 3 days to eat one, and my dad had to go out and throw the football for her at 4 am. He thought she was going to have a heart attack
Yes for sure there are arguements for and against everything on the list, BUT there have been cases of dogs getting salmonella from their owners giving them eggs. As i have said numerous times, it is up to each individual to decide what to and what not to feed their dogs, and i am not trying to say you should or shouldn't feed this or that :wink:

I only posted the article because i thought it might help :D
 

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solidstaffs said:
Yes for sure there are arguements for and against everything on the list, BUT there have been cases of dogs getting salmonella from their owners giving them eggs.
I agree with you and your article completely. Except for the egg part. Yes dogs can get salmonella, but the chance of them getting it is as likely as us getting it... does it stop you from eating eggs?

but to each their own (had to throw that in because I knew you would again). Just wanted to share information too so people who do use eggs for the benifit of their dog dont stop
 

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Kate said:
solidstaffs said:
Yes for sure there are arguements for and against everything on the list, BUT there have been cases of dogs getting salmonella from their owners giving them eggs.
I agree with you and your article completely. Except for the egg part. Yes dogs can get salmonella, but the chance of them getting it is as likely as us getting it... does it stop you from eating eggs?

but to each their own (had to throw that in because I knew you would again). Just wanted to share information too so people who do use eggs for the benifit of their dog dont stop
No salmonella never stopped me from eating eggs..........But bird flu did :shock: :lol: :lol:
 

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Wow, I found this very informative. I've had a lot of concerns as to what was okay for Angus (EB) as he's a huge mooch. He just loves frozen fruit as treats on these hot days. I was concerned about the eggs too. I had a trainer tell us that giving him a raw egg (shell and all) in the back yard to play with and then squash and eat was okay. I haven't done it yet and probably won't now. I agree that it may not be harmful right off but we have no idea of the long term efect and since EB's already have short life expectancy I don't plan on rushing it.
 
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