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I have found the rubber ones to be the best. They fit in your hand and our dogs don't fight me any more, in fact they like getting brushed every other day now.
 

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I use the rubber brush and a boar bristle brush. The rubber brush is good to stimulate the skin and the boar bristle brush is soft, does not scratch their skin but does distribute the oil throughout their coat. You can get a Boar Bristle Brush at Sallys Beauty Supply cheaper than a pet store. Also check out the people's comb and brush section in Walmart.
 

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Speaking from experience (because I do groom dogs), I recommend three different brushes:

A rubber brush (Zoom Groom)


A 100% boar bristle brush (soft to medium grade)


And a Furminator


The Zoom groom is good for daily once overs, dogs love how it feels like a good massage. It's very gentle
over those bony spots. The boar brush is gret for adding shine, it distributes oils from the skin to the ends
of each hair. I like to spray a leave in conditioner on the bully coats and then do a once over with the boar brush.
For that I recommend THE STUFF, a leave in conditioning spray that adds shine while helping to repel dirt which
is great for light colored dogs. The furminator is awesome at removing dead hair and I recommend it because if
you furminate once in a while it really cuts down on the amount of shedding. Most of the hair on your furniture is
hair that has been dead for a while, so if you remove the dead hair before it removes itself then it won't have a
chance to get on your couch. LOL. The Furminator is a solid object with zero give, so don't go too hard and be
careful over bony spots (like ribcage, spine, and hips).

This is the order I recommend for the grooming tools:
Zoom Groom to loosen the hair, scrubbing back and forth with and against the grain of hair.
Then use the furminator in nice short strokes going with the grain of the hair (never against).
Then use a conditioning spray and boar brush, with the grain of the hair in long strokes.
 

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Believe it or not, we have pits come in all the time. You'd think people would just groom the dogs themselves.
I don't complain though, because they are all very well behaved dogs. I just feel bad that they pay $50 starting.
They don't seem to care and even tip us well, we have all the upper class preppy pit owners here. LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have a boar bristle brush for her already, but I got her a Zoom Groom today she loves it. What is the best place to get a furminator?
 

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We order our grooming supplies wholesale so I'm not sure where they sell them.
I do know retail they sell for around $35, it's not a cheap thing.
 

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Think i've seen furminator at petsmart.
I have a shedding blade but does the furminator work better?

Orson's white neck hair is alot longer than anything else and he sheds
alot more from there also. You can just pinch the area most times and get
a handful of white fur. weird!
 

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I used to use a shedding blade on my pit, but at my grooming salon now we use the furminator.
They work simliar, except I think the furminator is gentler. It doesn't have the sharp teeth of a shedding blade.
The neck hair on every breed is the thickest hair on the body, I'm not sure why but it is.
For that, you would stretch the skin taut (usually by grabbed the area of looser skin under the jaw).
Then use the shedding tool of your choice. The shedding blade works in larger areas quicker, but the Furminator
is (like I said) gentler. A shedding blade can cut your dog if you aren't careful, it has pointy teeth.
A Furminator has the sharp teeth hidden, so it grabs only the dead hair that runs through it.
I hope that makes sense, LOL.

Call and ask groomers in your area if they use it because you want to see how it works, most will let you go there
and try it yourself. At least, we do here. We teach clients (when we aren't too busy) how to use different brushes.
It's because we'd rather groom a dog that is tangle free, makes our job easier (so both client and groomer win).
 
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