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Yes dogs can sweat through the pads of their feet... Though they can't sweat like humans do, the main reason we sweat is to regulate body temperature. They for the most part can only pant to cool down, and regulate their temperature. Main reason why dogs such as the English Bulldog can over heat so easily, they have a harder time panting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
that's what i thought, through the pads of their feet.

but sometimes when i wake her up in the morning, her belly is warm and moist like if she had a nightmare or something.
 

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Maybe that's why their feet always stink?? :D Ok, I'm going to bed now. Stayed up doing laundry way too late tonight, and I have a feeling I'm going to regret it here in a few hours. :lol:
 

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Amocat00 said:
Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't "panting" also a dog's way of sweating?...
thats what I was always told and always believed.
 

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deuce's mommy said:
U guys are funny, but personally I don't stiff feet often, so I wouldn't know. Kinda gives me the munchies though.
LOL! Sometimes when Bella's been running around all day, I can smell her feet when we're on opposite sides of the couch. :lol:
 

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They also lose heat through their ears, where the skin is thin and the blood is close to the surface. That's why arctic dogs have such tiny ears, and desert dogs (like dingos) have such big ones.

More useless, trivial info from Jenn. *bows and leaves*
 

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Amocat00 said:
Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't "panting" also a dog's way of sweating?...
Well guess so? yes and no.. It is the only way for them to cool down their body temperature, much like sweating in humans. Dogs regulate their body temperature through their tongue, they don't "sweat" to regulate their temperature like humans do.. I don't think I'm explaining it well, and I'm saying the same thing. :lol:


EDIT ---> Here's some technical stuff that truly explains it.. Much better than I ever could for sure!

Dogs and temperature regulation



A common misconception is that dogs do not sweat. Primarily, dogs regulate their body temperature in a completely different way, through their tongue. That is why after a dog has been running or on a hot day you will see its mouth wide open and tongue hanging out. This is a very efficient form of cooling in terms of maximizing heat lost while conserving moisture, because it carries heat from the hottest part of the body, the interior core of the thorax, compared to sweating, which cools the already coolest part of the body, the skin. Besides being intuitively correct, this higher efficiency of thermal loss in terms of moisture conservation stems from heat flow being proportional to temperature gradient in a given system. In addition, dogs effectively sweat through the pads of their feet, since they are not furred. Again, on a warm day and after exercise, a dog's naturally wet footprints might be visible on a smooth floor.



Dogs possess a rete mirabile in the carotid sinus at the base of their neck, a complex of intermingled small arteries and veins which acts as a heat exchanger to thermally isolate the head, containing the brain, the most temperature sensitive organ, from the body, containing the muscles, where most of the heat is generated. The net result is that dogs can sustain a high degree of physical exertion over a prolonged time in a hot environment, compared to animals which lack this apparatus; thus, a dog chasing a jackrabbit through the desert may not be able to outrun the rabbit, but it can continue the chase until the rabbit literally drops dead from overheating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
except the EB, he'll choke first.

thanks for the insight Jenn and i always thought the head contained the brain.... is there someplace else???!!! :p :lol:

Dogs possess a rete mirabile in the carotid sinus at the base of their neck, a complex of intermingled small arteries and veins which acts as a heat exchanger to thermally isolate the head, containing the brain
 
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