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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We've had Remy since the middle of March, and I've been working every single day on "down" with him. HE JUST DOESN'T GET IT! He'll plop down on the ground if I put my hand on the ground and kind of show him what I want him to do, but he won't "down" if I just say it. I can physically get him down, but he's just not associating the word with the action. Is it just possible that he's really dumb?? He's a fabulous dog otherwise. He comes when we call him. He is mild-mannered and not bossy/pushy (unlike Bella!) He sits on command, and he will go to his crate when we say any variation of the phrase "go to bed." He just looks at me like his head is full of rocks when I tell him to "down"! I'm not really frustrated by it. I think it's kind of endearing that he's kind of slow and doofus-y. Maybe I'm just not doing something right!
 

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Kate doesn't do "lie" unless I point to the ground and sometimes that doesnt even work, but its no fail when I have a treat. But She will paw at my hand when I say lie and point but she won't lie, like shes not sure what to do.

So I'm just saying your not the only one!!

But one question for you.... do you use down for anything else? Like if he jumps on you or furinature when you don't want him to? Because if so then that's your problem and you are confusing him with the meaning of the word. But if you don't do that then I'm not sure!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Kate said:
Kate doesn't do "lie" unless I point to the ground and sometimes that doesnt even work, but its no fail when I have a treat. But She will paw at my hand when I say lie and point but she won't lie, like shes not sure what to do.

So I'm just saying your not the only one!!

But one question for you.... do you use down for anything else? Like if he jumps on you or furinature when you don't want him to? Because if so then that's your problem and you are confusing him with the meaning of the word. But if you don't do that then I'm not sure!
Nope..."off" is our dogs' "get down" word. I hate when people come over to our house and use "down" to mean get down and get ticked when the dogs don't respond to it. Or, they'll say "Remy sit down." Come on people..."sit" and "down" are two different commands! :)
 

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I don't know if this will help, but.... start w/ him on your left (sitting), kneel down, and reach your left arm over his back. Using your hands under his arms, lower him to the ground. Praise, "yes, down", and treat. I don't mean to talk to you like you're an idiot, I know you're not, just trying to be visually descriptive. A lot of trainers have you in front of the dog, and the other way is how my sisters trainer works it. She always has the dog in position, then gives the word (down), then treats, until Remy associates the word with the command. Does that make sense?
 

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I taught Sam with food treats. Once he was in sit I'd hold the food treat in front of his nose and slowly drag it down and in front of him. In order to follow the treat he'd have to get into the down position. Once there I'd say down and give him his treat. You then move onto saying down and using your hand to make the down motion, lots of praise when it's done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Stormy said:
I taught Sam with food treats. Once he was in sit I'd hold the food treat in front of his nose and slowly drag it down and in front of him. In order to follow the treat he'd have to get into the down position. Once there I'd say down and give him his treat. You then move onto saying down and using your hand to make the down motion, lots of praise when it's done.
I've been doing this every day for 2 1/2 months. I have no problem luring him down, but when will he go down just on command?
 

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I think he just doesn't understand what you're asking.

Luring method
Sit down with one knee bent and lure him under your leg with a good stinky treat. He will naturally fold up to fit under your leg to get the treat (or toy). When he does that a few times, then name it but lure him under your leg anyway. I don't like physical manipulation because sometimes I find it just builds resistance (you pull and he pulls back) depending on the dog's personality.

Paula
 

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I don't know try a different word it might make it easier. CC will not stay, she looks at you like your talking crazy talk. but she'll wait. I can tell he to sit and wait and she'll stay. I tried stay she didn't respond and some how we turned it to wait, and it worked
 

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Leeann.Bella.Remy said:
Stormy said:
I taught Sam with food treats. Once he was in sit I'd hold the food treat in front of his nose and slowly drag it down and in front of him. In order to follow the treat he'd have to get into the down position. Once there I'd say down and give him his treat. You then move onto saying down and using your hand to make the down motion, lots of praise when it's done.
I've been doing this every day for 2 1/2 months. I have no problem luring him down, but when will he go down just on command?
Some dogs learn that quicker than others. Are you marking the action as soon as he's down with a "yes" or something? It might help for you to mark the action, because he may not be associating the action he just did with the reward.

Boss will lie down just when told "down," but he still won't "drop" unless I lour him, or point to the ground. So yeah, like I said some dogs take longer than others to move from louring or whatever you're doing, to just the verbal command, I think.
 

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Once the dog is doing it for treats, try every second one without a treat. Just the hand action and command. If that works, just start spreading out the times he recieves a treat. Sam is a very food orientated dog though so it was easy to teach him.
 

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For some reason Harley was more resistant to this command than of the other basics. Not for the same reasons as Remy it sounds like, though. Harley knew exactly what I wanted, just didn't want to comply. Sounds like it's different with Remy. I would give Harley the command, and she'd look away, (like, Nope). I'd put her in a down, and then , yes, down. OK. She only took about 2 weeks of this consistency before she'd do it on her own every time. Are you using a hand signal, too?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Stormy said:
Once the dog is doing it for treats, try every second one without a treat. Just the hand action and command. If that works, just start spreading out the times he recieves a treat. Sam is a very food orientated dog though so it was easy to teach him.
He'll go down without a treat if I bring my hand down to the ground, but he just stares at me like he's clueless when I say "down" and don't put my hand on the ground. I guess I was just spoiled with Bella, because she picked up "down" in a couple of hours when she was just a few months old!
 

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nanniesrock said:
For some reason Harley was more resistant to this command than of the other basics. Not for the same reasons as Remy it sounds like, though. Harley knew exactly what I wanted, just didn't want to comply. Sounds like it's different with Remy. I would give Harley the command, and she'd look away, (like, Nope). I'd put her in a down, and then , yes, down. OK. She only took about 2 weeks of this consistency before she'd do it on her own every time. Are you using a hand signal, too?
Yea both my dogs were the same way, they DID NOT want to lay down at all when we first started teaching it to them. Initially we got them to lay down by using the "step on the leash" method and giving them the command. After we could tell they were just being defiant we would correct them by giving the command once, and if they didn't lay down within 2 seconds giving them 2 quick downward jerks of the leash from their chin to the floor. They would usually lay right down after the correction. We would then give plenty of praise. The thing was not giving the command more than once, the trainer stressed you should only have to give the dog the command once, and if they do not do the action they should get a correction. I had a bad habit of saying Down Down Down getting louder and louder. They both lay down without any hesitation now.
 

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Chris said:
nanniesrock said:
For some reason Harley was more resistant to this command than of the other basics. Not for the same reasons as Remy it sounds like, though. Harley knew exactly what I wanted, just didn't want to comply. Sounds like it's different with Remy. I would give Harley the command, and she'd look away, (like, Nope). I'd put her in a down, and then , yes, down. OK. She only took about 2 weeks of this consistency before she'd do it on her own every time. Are you using a hand signal, too?
Yea both my dogs were the same way, they DID NOT want to lay down at all when we first started teaching it to them. Initially we got them to lay down by using the "step on the leash" method and giving them the command. After we could tell they were just being defiant we would correct them by giving the command once, and if they didn't lay down within 2 seconds giving them 2 quick downward jerks of the leash from their chin to the floor. They would usually lay right down after the correction. We would then give plenty of praise. The thing was not giving the command more than once, the trainer stressed you should only have to give the dog the command once, and if they do not do the action they should get a correction. I had a bad habit of saying Down Down Down getting louder and louder. They both lay down without any hesitation now.
Harley was the exact same way!! We never did the classes, so I'm sitting here going, OK, I can't repeat myself. I DO NOT want her to think compliance is optional. What do I do? I did the same as you, command, 2 sec., force compliance.Yes, down! OK. Worked no problem.

Sooo, if your training recall off leash, say in the backyard (fenced in) command "Harley, Come" and she ignores me,,,, what do I do now???? Don't want to keep calling, b/c it's only underlining the fact that she dosn't HAVE to. Should I go basck, and work it on a long leash?
 

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"Sooo, if your training recall off leash, say in the backyard (fenced in) command "Harley, Come" and she ignores me,,,, what do I do now???? Don't want to keep calling, b/c it's only underlining the fact that she dosn't HAVE to. Should I go basck, and work it on a long leash?"


Yes. I agree, you don't want to repeat your commands it sets up a bad trend. What I've done to correct poor recall is NOT call the dogs except when it is garaunteed (this is a method to build a good habit). So in the beginning with a dog that has lousy recall I would only call him for dinner (who doesn't come for dinner? your cat will come for dinner!). Other times I just go get the dog. Also I always reward a good recall. If your dog has done a bad thing and you call him and he comes and you punish him, you're not punishing the bad thing youre' punishing the recall. So recall has to be tasty (rewarding) and more valuable than what he was doing otherwise.

To begin to teach recall I use the 'come fore' excercise. The dog is on leash walking on heel and start backing up and reel him in to a 'front' (sitting in front of me) and reward him. When he gets 'come' on a short leash I graduate to a longer leash and than a longer leash. If you find you're not getting compliance you should definitely return to the long leash.

All this inforomatoin is based on my experience rasing ridgebacks - sighthounds are notoriously bad about recall, but my dogs have very good recall.

Paula
 

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That's been one of the hardest commands for both of mine to learn, also. Koda, poor thing, he's still learning, but anytime you say anything to him he automatically throws his paw up at you because that was the first thing he learned...he's so cute though!!! :lol:
 

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nanniesrock said:
Chris said:
nanniesrock said:
For some reason Harley was more resistant to this command than of the other basics. Not for the same reasons as Remy it sounds like, though. Harley knew exactly what I wanted, just didn't want to comply. Sounds like it's different with Remy. I would give Harley the command, and she'd look away, (like, Nope). I'd put her in a down, and then , yes, down. OK. She only took about 2 weeks of this consistency before she'd do it on her own every time. Are you using a hand signal, too?
Yea both my dogs were the same way, they DID NOT want to lay down at all when we first started teaching it to them. Initially we got them to lay down by using the "step on the leash" method and giving them the command. After we could tell they were just being defiant we would correct them by giving the command once, and if they didn't lay down within 2 seconds giving them 2 quick downward jerks of the leash from their chin to the floor. They would usually lay right down after the correction. We would then give plenty of praise. The thing was not giving the command more than once, the trainer stressed you should only have to give the dog the command once, and if they do not do the action they should get a correction. I had a bad habit of saying Down Down Down getting louder and louder. They both lay down without any hesitation now.
Harley was the exact same way!! We never did the classes, so I'm sitting here going, OK, I can't repeat myself. I DO NOT want her to think compliance is optional. What do I do? I did the same as you, command, 2 sec., force compliance.Yes, down! OK. Worked no problem.

Sooo, if your training recall off leash, say in the backyard (fenced in) command "Harley, Come" and she ignores me,,,, what do I do now???? Don't want to keep calling, b/c it's only underlining the fact that she dosn't HAVE to. Should I go basck, and work it on a long leash?
Definitely work on a long leash. It depends on the dog. Both my dogs are on longer indoor leashes at all times, and when we do distance training they are on 20 ft. long leashes. Unfortunately, I live in a townhouse so I don't have a fenced in back yard so I don't have the option of taking them completely off the leashes.

"To begin to teach recall I use the 'come fore' excercise. The dog is on leash walking on heel and start backing up and reel him in to a 'front' (sitting in front of me) and reward him. When he gets 'come' on a short leash I graduate to a longer leash and than a longer leash. If you find you're not getting compliance you should definitely return to the long leash. "

^^This is EXACTLY what we did to teach the call to come. Come meant to come and sit directly in front facing me, "come here" meant to come and sit anywhere in my area. It worked great. Again teaching the dog the command wasn't hard, it was getting them to do it with distractions and when they were not in eyesight (dogs downstairs, me upstairs) this is where keeping the long leads on them at all times came in.

Another option is to get a shock collar with a remote. Thats what my trainer suggested for off leash training.
 
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