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Agent Squint
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How can I stop Roxy charging to door when door bell goes? It's getting a bit of a hazard now Jamie's starting to walk. at the mo I keep them seperate, but on the occasion Jamie will use Roxy as a walking aid, and she will walk slowly for him...but if the door bell goes or she hear something she is off!

I really need to stop the whole charging off thing, last night we had a fox in the garden, she flew across the bed cut my face with her claws and when we was sitting on the sofa she heard the cat flap open she jumped up and charged for the back door, this time she cut my leg with claws. It has got worse, (probably due to lack of exercise)but how can I stop her, what is it in her that makes her this way? high prey drive? if I knew what I was dealing with then I can help work on a cure?

I have tried crating her, but she will destroy it with shear determination to get what ever it is she wants :(
 

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I've got the very same problem with the door bell. Pete takes off like a fool, even when I ask him to stop he just keeps on barking, his hackles up and everything. :evil:
I wish I had an answer for you!
Maybe someone out there will be able to help us both!
 

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ring it over and over and over and over so he may get conditioned it's no big deal...

just a suggestion, never had this problem before
 

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With the door bell, just an idea I had..... maybe get someone you know to come over "randomly" and ring the bell. But you will know the time that they are coming over so you can put roxy on a leash or something and work her OB like that. But have it done many times so she can get used to it.
 

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My suggestion: before you start ringing doorbells, first work on her sit/stay or down/stay, and come commands. When she gets good at staying and coming, with help from a doorbell ringing friend, put her in a sit/stay right where she's at, and rewarding with her ABSOLUTE, MOST FAVORITE treat; or entice her into another room (with treats) AND put her in a sit/stay everytime the doorbell rings. This accomplishes two things: 1) Tells her that she'll receive good things--treats--when the doorbell rings, thus, doorbell ringing is a good thing; 2) Teaches her to not run to the door when the doorbell rings because you have "counter-conditioned" her to do something other than run to the door.
 

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that's all great info!
I have a question: should I deter my husband from ringing the doorbell when he gets home? He just does it to make Pete bark but I'm trying to get Pete to NOT bark when it rings....what to do?

Thanks, Lisa
 

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carson said:
that's all great info!
I have a question: should I deter my husband from ringing the doorbell when he gets home? He just does it to make Pete bark but I'm trying to get Pete to NOT bark when it rings....what to do?

Thanks, Lisa
*Keep in mind, with many doggie issues, there is not always a "One size fits all" remedy*
Having written that, I don't see a problem with your husband ringing the doorbell, it could help because it'll will show Pete that good things are coming to the door.
Also, sometimes you have to teach your pooch to "speak" before you can teach him to be "quiet." Have you introduced Pete to the "Speak" command? If not, with tasty treat, teach him to bark on command. Then, I know this can be a little confusing for Pete, but once he can bark on command, with treats, try to teach him the "Quiet" or "Enough"--enough is our default word for stop whatever it is you are doing--commands. To silence a dog, some trainers bang on a cage or countertop while firmly saying "quiet!" Another way to quiet your pooch is to give him a toy to redirect his attention--and fill his mouth so he can't bark (hopefully).
 

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No, Pete does not know how to speak. He decides on his own to make little growly noises when he wants something - outside, treats, playing, or just plain attention - but he doesn't bark on command. This sounds like a good idea to try.
I think part of my training problem is my hubby. He and I speak different languages to Petey - both English, just different words. It seems like everything I do, he undoes. It drives me nuts and the only way I think I can fix it is to go to professional training, spending his money, and explaining to him "this is what the trainer says". Maybe then I'll have a better behaved dog!
But in the meantime, I'll give your (Bodie) suggestion a go!!
 

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I have been reading to replace naughty behavior with a good one.. For example, train your baby with a new trick get her to do that and the command is the doorbell.
 

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In my house, I have four dogs with "gang mentallity". Holly, the Springer Spaniel, is the one to start and lead the barking whether inside or out, She is the one that I call the Sentry, (first alert). When she senses something or hears something she feels it is her job to alert everyone else. Sasha, the Border Collie Chow, who is the 100 lb alpha dog, will then pick up the alert and charge in to take over the "guard". Rusty, the male St. Bernard/Shepard mix, stands back between me or the house and whatever needs guarding against. And poor Clara just joins in because she doesn't not know what is going on but she will be "d==ned if she will be left out.

The good thing about all this is that they are all mouth and no action except for Rusty. He would attack if he felt there was danger to me or to the other dogs - but he is the type to lay back and give lots of warning about not coming any closer. He would only attack if he were brought to that issue or corner. This is the dog that always lays down inbetween me and the doors so that they have to come through him first.
Only dog I have ever had to put himself on the line like that.
:love7:
 
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