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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all I am wondering if you could give me some advice, well my friend actually

:roll: Yeah it's one of though's "My friend has a problem" questions :lol:


Anyway her dog is three years old (it's not a bully breed)

When she takes it out for walks it goes off it's lead (in the park) and returns when asked to do so. However it will escape from the house and back garden every time some one leaves a door open and will not come back when called.

My friend thinks Lilly enjoys the chase she gets when she escapes. Leaving her to return of her own free will is not an option as they live near roads and Lilly has nearly been run over once. My poor friend is really stressed about this and asked me for some advice. I really didn't know what to advice so I thought I would ask you lot

Thanks
Lesley
 

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Yemi said:
Hi all I am wondering if you could give me some advice, well my friend actually

:roll: Yeah it's one of though's "My friend has a problem" questions :lol:


Anyway her dog is three years old (it's not a bully breed)

When she takes it out for walks it goes off it's lead (in the park) and returns when asked to do so. However it will escape from the house and back garden every time some one leaves a door open and will not come back when called.

My friend thinks Lilly enjoys the chase she gets when she escapes. Leaving her to return of her own free will is not an option as they live near roads and Lilly has nearly been run over once. My poor friend is really stressed about this and asked me for some advice. I really didn't know what to advice so I thought I would ask you lot

Thanks
Lesley
Your friend needs to fence her yard or some enclosure around one of her doors to stop her dog from running out. Also she needs to train her dog to 'wait' at the door or put her dog on leash when she opens the door. This dog has learned this habit as surely as if she had been trained to do it so I wouldn't keep letting her do it.

Paula
 

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Hi:
I would begin teaching "Wait" to the dog ASAP
Here is a good article to give to your friend.
Sue
Teaching Wait:

Throughout the process of training and living with your dog, you will find that some commands seem more practical than others. They seem to fit a lot of different situations and because of this, are used more frequently than some. A few commands can have the power to save your dogs life.

Wait can be used to teach your dog not to bolt out the front door, run blindly into street, or to not jump out of the car when you open the door. In my private life, this command is used the most out any commands I use for my dogs.

We being teaching your dog to wait for you by controlling your environment.
Let's start with a usual problem area "Your front door".

Put a leash on your dog so you know he can't get away from you if your not fast enough.

Before you open the door, place a flat open hand in front of your dog's eyes and tell him "WAIT". Only say this once, repeating yourself has no effect.

You will then try to open the door, just a little at first. If your dog moves toward the door, tell him "Uh-Uh" and shut the door. Your goal is to the the door totally open, the leash slack and your dog not bolting across the threshold. When your dog remains behind the door, reward him for it by throwing some treats onto his side of the door.

Next, lets try to see if you can get through the door by yourself. Turn and face your dog as you back out the door. Two other ways that you can correct your dog if he starts to cross the doorway are using your body, you can do a body block and step into him as he BEGINS to cross don't wait for him to get across the doorway either) when he back up tell him "Good Wait". The final correction we will use the leash. At this point it should be slack in your hands. If your dog starts to cross, tell him "Uh-Uh" and use the leash quickly to pull him back onto his side of the line. Remember you are on the other side of the doorway from him. Use these corrections in conjunction with each other stepping in towards the dog and then use the leash. Keep rewarding him when he is making no attempt to cross the line.

Wait is not a stay. Stay meeds freeze, do not move. Wait allows your dog to move around anywhere behind the threshold that you have decided upon. There are not as many restrictions placed upon the dog with "Wait". Stay should be taught and re-enforced to your dog as well.

So, now your dog is on one side of the door and you are on the other. Let's test to see if your obedience teaching has sunk in. You will add distractions to see if Cairo remains on his side of the line even with the distractions on your side. Drop some of the same treats you have been rewarding Cairo with into your side of the line. Yes, you have it correct. Cairo is not allowed to cross the line to get his rewards. If he tries to cross, Say "Uh-Uh" and place him back onto his side of the line. Once he remains on his side tell him "Good Wait" and toss him succulent treats.

How does your dog learn that he is allowed to cross the line? Use a release word. The word should be used for only that purpose. To release your dog from what he is doing, pick a word (I use OK) When you first use it your dog may not come across the line because for the past 5 minutes, you have been telling him this was not appropriate for him to do. You may have to bend down and act excited when you say it. Once he crosses to you, REWARD HEAVILY.

Now the two of you can go out and begin your adventures for the day.

Once you and your dog have a mutual understanding of how important this command is, you should start using it in as many different situations as possible. This will help cement it's importance in your dog's life.

This command has the ability to save your dog's life so treat it as such.
 

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^ what they said. Everytime I take my dogs out, I make them wait at the door and talk to them, pet them, etc and reinforce 'stay' or 'wait', even if I have the door partly open. When I want them to come out I say 'go' or 'come' depending on if I want them to walk out ahead of me or to follow me. Teaches them restraint and calms them down when the door is open, that way you won't have hyper dogs whenever the door is opened :) It's the hyperness / excitement that makes them not want to listen. Think of it like a switch, there's times where you want them to run and be excited and times where you want control. You have to train them to acknowledge this. I also normally save 'go' for when they are off-lead. That's my switch command for them to run at their leisure.
 

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Yemi said:
Hi all I am wondering if you could give me some advice, well my friend actually

:roll: Yeah it's one of though's "My friend has a problem" questions :lol:


Anyway her dog is three years old (it's not a bully breed)

When she takes it out for walks it goes off it's lead (in the park) and returns when asked to do so. However it will escape from the house and back garden every time some one leaves a door open and will not come back when called.

My friend thinks Lilly enjoys the chase she gets when she escapes. Leaving her to return of her own free will is not an option as they live near roads and Lilly has nearly been run over once. My poor friend is really stressed about this and asked me for some advice. I really didn't know what to advice so I thought I would ask you lot

Thanks
Lesley
I am not an expert by any means but this is the rare occassion that I don't agree with every one else....That is only becuase it is important to know what breed the dog is. Some breeds like Malamutes, Siberian Huskeys, Shiba Inus, Some Terriers the list goes on are very independant dog and it is recommended to never trust them off a leash...This dog are escape artists and enjoy roaming some of there breeds are never supposed to be allowed freedom, I realize that training is a factor but it is in their blood............And secondly the dog prob. does enjoy the chase it thinks that it is a game ..Maybe she can try a long lead and do recall but if the dog is a wonderer you can never trust fully off lead..... Here is a link that I thought was great but obviously it is up to you
http://www.bulldogbreeds.com/discuss/viewtopic.php?t=8003
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks so much for your replies my friend is going to have a go with the "wait" I'm sure she will do fine.


Paula her garden out the back is fenced but the front isn't a lot of houses in England have open drives which would be impossible to fence. She is going to take the advice given here. Thanks again everyone.

Lesley
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sorry Angie I wasn't ignoring you our posts crossed :lol:


The dog she has is a miniature Schnauzer, she's really good off the lead in the park, always returning when asked. The problem is when she manages to get out of the front door (kids' not paying attention etc :roll: )
Her (friend that is) only hope is to teach her not to go out until she is told. She was really pleased when I told her about the replies to this post and is going to have a real go to teach her to wait.
 
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