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To me, drive has a purpose. The drive to chase and catch prey, the drive to defend oneself, etc. Energy, while it can be channeled, can also be without direction - a great example is a dog with the zoomies, the only point of the exercise is to release the energy.

You can have drive with mediocre determination - these are the dogs that lose interest or give up. What you see at this point is a drop in drive because the dog has not had success. On the other hand, there are dogs that are more determined in general; dogs that will push harder, try harder, and try longer with no reward in an effort to obtain that reward. For these dogs, a session with no reward can be beneficial.
 

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I think that one's understanding of "high drive" also has to do with experience. The spectrum against which we can actually place our own dogs. I know my thoughts on my dogs drive levels, Dylan in particular, have changed dramatically since I have seen a ton more dogs in the last year or so. I used to think D was high drive :lol: but really he's nothing special, just a pet who happens to have enough drive that it allows him to do the work at a low to mediocre level.
 

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Yes and dogs can be classified as high drive but on different levels, like a border collie VS an american bulldog, both potentially high drive breeds with different drives.

I think horse will have drive enough to allow him to participate but not anything compared to a well bred GSD. I am not expecting anyone to be blown away by his drives but I think he will do OK and its a foot in the door and the next dog will be better.

Experience can tell you a lot of things that reading all the books or websites will not tell you.
A high drive dog is a high drive dog. I don't care what breed it is.
 

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Well, drive can be broken down into different types of drive and depending on who you talk there the list may be a little different. Here is a short list of the common drives that are discussed:
- prey drive
- play drive
- hunt drive
- fight drive
- defense drive
- pack drive

So, a dog can have high prey/play drive but not so much hunt drive, meaning it will play with the toy but once the toy is lost it's like "oh whatever."
 

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Time to take the ball away and only let him have it when he is interacting with you. ;)
 

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What's the ped on your dog? You can pm it to me if you want.
May I ask why you don't work the dog? Not trying to be a bitch, but if he's all you say he is and you have this great access to trainers what is stopping you?
 
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