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What's the ped on your dog? You can pm it to me if you want.
May I ask why you don't work the dog? Not trying to be a bitch, but if he's all you say he is and you have this great access to trainers what is stopping you?
 

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What's the ped on your dog? You can pm it to me if you want.
May I ask why you don't work the dog? Not trying to be a bitch, but if he's all you say he is and you have this great access to trainers what is stopping you?
That's actually a really good question. I used to be really passionate about wanting a good working dog and getting fully into it, but ever since I moved to NYC, it's become very difficult to even get out to any clubs, on a regular basis. I know a couple good trainers upstate NY who are fairly close to me, but it's also very tough for me to get up there often enough. I don't have enough time to commit to it, very busy with work. I know how much dedication it takes, and I wouldn't want to give it a half-assed approach. One day though, when I'm ready.

I have to say though, I'm very very very lucky that I have a personal friend with bulldog experience who is my dog walker!

I'll get you the info on my boy if you're interested, or can post it up, no problem.
 

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Well, drive can be broken down into different types of drive and depending on who you talk there the list may be a little different. Here is a short list of the common drives that are discussed:
- prey drive
- play drive
- hunt drive
- fight drive
- defense drive
- pack drive

So, a dog can have high prey/play drive but not so much hunt drive, meaning it will play with the toy but once the toy is lost it's like "oh whatever."
I like this - never thought of breaking down the drive. I think Omi has a strong hunt drive. I've said prey in the past - but hunt seems to fit what I've observed her do more closely. Thanks for posting this. Great thread!!
 

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Thanks Lisa fro starting this, definately informational. I thought this little info from a trainer was interesting:

"Toy, Food, and Pack Drives
When doing obedience, I try to implement toy, food, and pack drive as a
basis for a reward. A good dog should work in any one of these drives at
any given time. Determing which one should be used at that moment is the
key.
If you are teaching your dog the send out with a toy, and your dog has
no toy drive, this is futile. Build the toy drive to a place where it is
extremely high before even thinking about using it in obedience. Back tie
your dog, and tease him to build the drive for the ball or tug or tease him
when he's in the kennel with the toy. The play should be very intense and
short. Most handlers tend to settle for mediocre toy drive, and this can
cause the dog to be complacent in obedience. The toy should be what ever
you have, be it a stick, ball, tug, leather rag etc. The toy shouldn't be
an entity in itself; it should be something that interacts you with the dog.
Teach the dog to bring it back, and then play tug-of-war, and teach the dog
the skill of interacting with you and the toy. Another great prase to
remeber is that you own the toy, the dog only rents it.
When using food, make sure the food drive is extremely high. Some
people let their dogs self-feed or eat when they want. I think dogs should
be given 4 minutes twice a day to finish their food. If a dog can't
concentrate for four minutes on its food, doing an entire SchH routine will
be extremely difficult unless you are only using toy drive as a reward. I
tell people that they should feed in different locations. Feed your dog in
the front yard, in front of a pet store, in the bedroom, and teach him to
concentrate on his food where ever he is. Most Rotts have very high food
drive, but if you happen to have one that doesn't, these things can help.
Pack drive is a drive that most trainers do not discuss often enough.
This is simply relationship. A great phrase in the bringing up of children
is, "Discipline without rapport brings rebellion." If we are going to
expect our dogs to work for us through discipline, the dog has to know we
love them and have a relationship with them. The praise has to be from the
heart. I always use to hear the Germans say, "You praise, but not from the
heart." The dog has to feel you mean it, or the praise will fall on deaf
ears.
When you have these three drives at an optimal point, then I would
suggest doing obedience. Using which reward is the key to doing correct
obedience. I got the following technique from Martin Vollrath who is an
excellent, excellent trainer. In the early 90's at a seminar he said, "Use
food for correctness and the toy for speed." I've used that method since
then. Another thing that I would suggest is if you are going to have to
have a session with a lot of corrections, use food and not the toy. Food is
for survival whereas the toy should represent relationship. If you are
having a session with a lot of corrections, using the toy during that
session will only diminish the relationship and the drive for the toy.
Obedience should be harmony where the dog wants to please the handler and
wants its own drive goal. If the drive is high enough, the dog will offer
behaviors that you can readily reward. For instance, if I said, "I will
give you 5 million dollars to offer a behavior" many would do interesting
things for the reward. Some would offer the behavior of standing on their
head to sitting in a chair. But, if I offered Bill Gates 2 dollars to do a
behavior, he wouldn't even get out of the chair. There's no reason to do
so. We have to make our dogs reward equal to 5 million dollars. This will
make obedience much easier and a happy picture.
Using these drives to teach the dog focus and concentration is an
important element. If my dog has had 23 hours and 30 minutes to do what it
likes, then asking for 30 minutes of intense focus is not asking too much
nor is it unfair."
 

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Yes and this is why you refer to a high food drive as a dog who will do anything for a small piece of food, or prey drive as a dog who will do anything to catch an animal or chase a moving object.

The drive though vs the energy is the goal, high energy dogs will do something just to burn energy, there is no goal, high drive dogs have a goal, a driving force.

I think horse is high/moderate drive and moderate energy level, my mastiff his moderate drive with a moderate energy level, my pug is low drive and low energy level. All dogs will have some level of drive (bloodhounds for example, their drive is to track) and depending on what drives your dog and what the genetic temperament is like is really what governs what sports they will do well in. But a sport like agility most dogs can do, even a dog with a low drive, they might not excel in it but they can still do it, where as a sport like SchH the dog needs a high drive and a correct temperament.

I have been doing lots of reading (probably to much) about drive lately lol.
So basically a high energy dog would chase a squirrel just to get rid of energy, But a high drive dog would chase the squirrel for the goal of killing it.
 

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Well, drive can be broken down into different types of drive and depending on who you talk there the list may be a little different. Here is a short list of the common drives that are discussed:
  • prey drive
  • play drive
  • hunt drive
  • fight drive
  • defense drive
  • pack drive

So, a dog can have high prey/play drive but not so much hunt drive, meaning it will play with the toy but once the toy is lost it's like "oh whatever."
Could you please explain each drive in detail.
 

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I
tell people that they should feed in different locations. Feed your dog in
the front yard, in front of a pet store, in the bedroom, and teach him to
concentrate on his food where ever he is.
If you start this at a young age of 8 weeks old my question for this is what if you feed raw I'm gonna feed my pup primal that is already pre-made and has everything to be a full raw meal how would I feel my pup anywhere outdoors with the raw feed now would I be able to just throw a few treats in a travel bowl since mixing kibble and raw is bad for a dogs digestive.
 

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Tye_nna tell us about your puppy. What breed and type is it? What are your plans for your pup? House dog, therapy dog, rescue dog, hunting dog, working dog? This will determine the type of training your pup will require.
 

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Tye_nna tell us about your puppy. What breed and type is it? What are your plans for your pup? House dog, therapy dog, rescue dog, hunting dog, working dog? This will determine the type of training your pup will require.
Ok so, sorry if I was specific enough this is for a year or two from now I'm gonna get Red merle Female Border collie puppy my plans for her was to do Agility, Disc, and Dock diving Disc for fun, Agility for fun, but Dock diving I might do competitions for therefore I think she would be a working dog but I'd still want her family friendly and good with other people, dogs and our cat. Also I dont know if this matters but I have a Rescue dog she is a husky and border collie mix technically a house and or family pet and I wanna get her into Dock diving and maybe some rat hunting after she learns a lot more training.
 

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Thank you, Tye_nna. It is good to do your research for a future pup. If you have an agility trainer in your area ask them if you may observe a class or a trial.
Start out with a good obedience class and then work into agility. You and your pup should have a lot of fun.

When you get your pup, please make sure that your husky mix is introduced to your pup before hand. Some huskies are not pup lovers and will kill them.
So do take precautions.
 
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