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I found this article online and thought it might be helpful. It's a little long, so I'm just posting the link. It has x-rays down at the bottom to show what hip joints should and should not look like.

http://www.thepetcenter.com/xra/hd.html
 

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Thanks for posting this. It gave me some good info on signs to look for. As you probably know, Chico has been limping off and on for a couple of months and I need to get him x-rayed. We just signed up for some health insurance so I have to wait for that to go through. I wanted to get the insurance just in case it is something major.
 

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Chico-Heidi. Not sure if you realize this and not sure if you have already seen a vet regarding the dogs' limping BUT the pet insurance will not cover any pre exisisting conditions. The insurance company will probably ask for a health record from your vet when you sign up for it and if there is anything on the record regarding the limping it won't be covered. Just a heads up.
 

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Thanks Lisa, that's the whole reason we haven't gone in yet. The insurance I found will cover hip dysplasia but not if he has any record of it. The only thing that Chico has on record is mange but as long as it wasn't adult onset, the insurance would still take us. His limping is really minor and only after he excercises. He doesn't do it too often but I would like to have him checked out just to make sure there isn't something going on. I have a friend with a golden retriever that needed a full hip replacement surgery and it was really expensive. The injury insurance kicks in 24 hrs. after they policy goes into effect but the illness coverage has a 30day waiting period.
 

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Chico.Heidi said:
Thanks Lisa, that's the whole reason we haven't gone in yet. The insurance I found will cover hip dysplasia but not if he has any record of it. The only thing that Chico has on record is mange but as long as it wasn't adult onset, the insurance would still take us. His limping is really minor and only after he excercises. He doesn't do it too often but I would like to have him checked out just to make sure there isn't something going on. I have a friend with a golden retriever that needed a full hip replacement surgery and it was really expensive. The injury insurance kicks in 24 hrs. after they policy goes into effect but the illness coverage has a 30day waiting period.

Not sure if you are giving him anything, but if not, some Glucosamine and some asprin will help him until you can take him to the vet.
 

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Not sure if you are giving him anything, but if not, some Glucosamine and some asprin will help him until you can take him to the vet.
[/quote]

I have him on glucosamine, msm, chondroitin but no aspirin. What dosage should I be giving him? He weighs 85lbs. He's fine most of the time, it's only if he's been running around the house too much or out on a long walk. I'm gonna just take him on short walks until they check him out. It's just like he gets kinda stiff. It's only on one side too.
 

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Giving Your Dog Aspirin

by Ron Kurtus (revised 21 May 2004)

If your dog has chronic pain or inflammation, common aspirin can often be used to give your pet some relief. Since aspirin can cause some stomach problems, care should be used. It is wise to check with your vet before administering aspirin or any other medication.

Questions you may have include:

* What is aspirin used for in dogs?
* What warnings or problems are there?
* How much should I give?

This lesson will answer those questions. There is a mini-quiz near the end of the lesson. Animal Health Disclaimer
Uses for aspirin

Dogs are most commonly given aspirin for treatment of arthritis and associated joint pain. There may be other situations where your dog is in pain, where aspirin may give relief.

Aspirin has good anti-inflammatory effects that reduces swelling. It can also reduce pain and fever. These effects will help make your dog more comfortable.

Note that a dog is not a human. Just because your dog "does not feel good" is not a reason to give it an aspirin. Usually, aspirin is given to relieve extreme conditions of discomfort. Also note that most vets prescribe Rimadyl as a better pain-killer and anti-inflammatory than aspirin.
Use caution

You should use caution In administering any medication to a pet, because too much may be toxic, the medicine may not be tolerated, or it can cause an upset stomach or ulcers in the animal.
Can be toxic

It can be toxic if given in high doses of about 30 mg per pound of the dog. This means that even baby aspirin could be poisonous for dogs weighing two pounds or less. An adult aspirin which is 320 mg. would be toxic for a 10-pound dog. To be sure that you are using the aspirin for the right reason and at the right dose, you should consult your veterinarian first.
Not for young dogs or cats

Aspirin is poorly tolerated by young dogs, since they lack the enzymes necessary to process the aspirin. The same is true for most cats.
Upset stomach

Aspirin can cause gastrointestinal upsets and ulcers in dogs, just as in humans. You should pay attention to your dog's eating habits when administering aspirin to watch for signs of an upset stomach. If there are any signs of ulcers, such as blood-tinged vomiting, it is important to stop the aspirin.

Giving the aspirin with food and using buffered aspirin is the best to prevent stomach problems.

I prefer to grind up the aspirin and put it in some food to make sure it does not irritate the stomach lining.
No Tylenol

You should not give your dog such products as Tylenol as a substitute for real aspirin. Some people say their vet prescribed Tylenol, but most sources say it should not be given to animals.
Recommended dosage

Most veterinarians recommend between 5 mg and 10 mg per pound of the dog's weight every 12 hours. Going on the safe side, a recommended dosage of aspirin of about 5 mg/lb seems to work well for most dogs. If you are going to give more, it is a good idea to check with your vet. Also, note that a small dog should take less per pound.

Enteric coated aspirin is not recommended in dogs because about half the time the coating isn't digested and the aspirin is excreted whole in the stool.
Start small

It is better to start off small and work your way up to the maximum. If the dog has relief with a smaller dosage, that is great.

A standard aspirin is 320 mg. A baby aspirin is typically 80 mg. That means that 5 mg/lb works out to be one baby aspirin per 16 pounds of body weight twice a day.
Chart

The following chart can be used as a guide. Note that this is not medical advice.
Weight of dog in pounds Number of tablets each 12 hours mg
8 1/2 baby aspirin or less 40 mg
16 1 baby aspirin 80 mg
32 1/2 adult or 2 baby 160 mg
48 3/4 adult or 3 baby 240 mg
64 1 adult or 4 baby 320 mg
80 1 1/4 adult or 5 baby 400 mg
96 1 1/2 adult or 6 baby 480 mg


In conclusion

The proper dosage of aspiring can give your dog relief from pain and inflammation. You should be aware of possible problems and know the proper dosage. It is good to check with a vet before giving any medication, and remember that dogs are not humans and don't need an aspirin for minor pains.
 

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I think I'll hold off on that, it sounds kinda scary. He does limp around a little off and on. But it hasn't kept him from running around and trying to rough house. He doesn't seem too concerned, it's mostly me that wants to get him checked out to ease my mind. I just want to make sure that he doesn't have a problem that is going untreated but I think I'll hold off on the aspirin unless he seems to be in alot of pain. If he seems to be in a lot of pain, I'll just take him in though. I'm not gonna let him suffer just cause I'm waiting for insurance! That would be crazy!
 

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Chico.Heidi said:
I think I'll hold off on that, it sounds kinda scary. He does limp around a little off and on. But it hasn't kept him from running around and trying to rough house. He doesn't seem too concerned, it's mostly me that wants to get him checked out to ease my mind. I just want to make sure that he doesn't have a problem that is going untreated but I think I'll hold off on the aspirin unless he seems to be in alot of pain. If he seems to be in a lot of pain, I'll just take him in though. I'm not gonna let him suffer just cause I'm waiting for insurance! That would be crazy!

I agree, you do want to be careful, just like people, some dogs may be sensitive to asprin. I would start off with a baby asprin to see how Chico reacts to it. In all honesty, I have not had a problem with asprin with any dog I have owned. Rusty is an 85 lb dog and the vet told me to give him two adult asprin. They also told me to give him one over the counter Zantac one hour before the asprin if it bothers his stomach, which it did not. Sasha, my biggest dog, has hip problems and has had hip problems all her life. This is the regimine she has been on since she was six months old. She is now 12 and only has problems when the weather is cold or rainy. When it is, out comes the asprin. You do have to make your own choice for Chico, but asprin has been such a big help for my dogs. They would have been in so much pain without it and there is not any surgery that would have helped Sasha, as it was a growth problem. All my best to Chico.

How does glucosamine help exactly?

It helps to reduce the inflammation and it rebuilds the cartilage inbetween the joints. It was first used in arthritis patients and then was used by vets in dogs. It really does work in both people and dogs, However, I do find that it can really irritate the stomach, so a Zantac may need to be taken an hour before giving it to the dog.
 

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How does glucosamine help exactly?


It helps to reduce the inflammation and it rebuilds the cartilage inbetween the joints. It was first used in arthritis patients and then was used by vets in dogs. It really does work in both people and dogs, However, I do find that it can really irritate the stomach, so a Zantac may need to be taken an hour before giving it to the dog.
Is it something that I should give Mo. He doesn't seem to have joint problems now. Is it preventative or just a treatment?
 

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Is it something that I should give Mo. He doesn't seem to have joint problems now. Is it preventative or just a treatment?

I would not call it a preventative. It is more like a strengthner such as iron to the blood. It builds stronger cartilage and in doing so it does help to prevent problems down the road. Just like taking good vitamins helps to keep your immune system up to fight off diseases.
 

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Just wanted to add another thing about aspirin. It's a blood thinner (in fact, I have to take it daily because I have thrombophilia -- a blood clotting disorder). So if you give your dog aspirin, then he suddenly needs surgery, or God forbid, hurts himself -- he would possibly develop bleeding complications. As you've already figurred out, it's probably not worth the risk.
 

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If you want a natural way around the asprin but get the same effects you can use White Willow Bark. It's a natural asprin, and you can find it at any health food store.

Also if you think there may a a chance of hip dysplasia I would give him some Ester-C. A lot of studies have been done on ascorbic acid, vitamin C, and Ester-C for hip dysplasia in dogs. There have been great results for healing and preventing. Ester-C is better for dogs because it is time released and easy on their stomachs. You can find this at a health food store or probably even Walmart.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I'm glad that link helped you Chico.Heidi. There has been a lot of good info contained in this thread!
 

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Care said:
If you want a natural way around the asprin but get the same effects you can use White Willow Bark. It's a natural asprin, and you can find it at any health food store.

Also if you think there may a a chance of hip dysplasia I would give him some Ester-C. A lot of studies have been done on ascorbic acid, vitamin C, and Ester-C for hip dysplasia in dogs. There have been great results for healing and preventing. Ester-C is better for dogs because it is time released and easy on their stomachs. You can find this at a health food store or probably even Walmart.

Good luck.
Thanks for the advice. I currently give Chico 1500mg. of Esther-C a day. On the old forum I saw a thread that was saying to feed 2000mg. but Im afraid of giving him too much. Do you know what the proper dose is? He is about 85lbs right now. Also would you give the willow bark along with the Esther-c or just one or the other? I have to wait two more weeks before his insurance will kick in. I don't want to get x-rays done until then because if he does have hip dysplasia, and there is a record of it in the 30day waiting period, it will not be coverred. He isn't limping right now and I've been taking him on shorter walks so he doesn't seem to be in pain at the moment. I don't want anyone to think I'm neglecting him! :(

Also, thanks again Tasha for posting this in the first place!
 
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