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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there one and all. i have a problem with jake a 4month old pit. He is really a great dog but i just cant stop him from biting me or anyone eles for that matter. It's not like he is charging but if we come home or just sit in the living room insted of licking us he is biting... How can i stop this...It's starting to leave marks.lol I have trying to give him something to chew on when im petting him but Jake doesnt want anything to do with it. He just keeps on biting.
does anyone out there have a solution.
 

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Since he doesn't stop when you replace your arm with something else to chew on, try ignoring him. When your messing with him and he starts to bite you, ignore him. Only thing I can really suggest.
 

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http://www.canismajor.com/dog/bite2.html

"No bite!"
Angel days and devil days: teaching bite inhibition to puppies

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Q: My Dalmatian puppy is almost nine weeks old. I got him when he was five weeks. He's playful and fun but I can't get him to stop biting me. That seems to be the only way he likes to play anymore — rough! I've been telling him No!, holding his mouth shut while saying “No bite!” and even shoving my hand back in his mouth like a trainer told me to do. Nothing seems to work. In fact, he thinks I'm playing a game with him and gets more excited the more I try to stop him. Sometimes he walks right up and attacks me! What can I do? Is he vicious?

A: No, he's not vicious, he's just being a normal, rambunctious, and sometimes obnoxious puppy. To get control of your pup's biting, it helps to understand why puppies bite in the first place.

Biting and mouthing are normal behaviors for puppies. Dogs don't have hands so they investigate objects and their environment with their mouths. To a curious puppy, everything about this big world is brand new and exciting. He learns as he goes along. You can almost hear his thought processes as he discovers something he's never seen before: "Hmmm...what's this? [chomping on it] Something to eat? No? [tossing it around] Can I play with it? Maybe. Can I make it squeak?"

Playing is also a normal learning behavior for puppies, especially play-fighting. Play-fighting with littermates and other animals develops reflexes, coordination and physical skill. It also helps them develop social skills and teaches them how to interact positively within their canine society, their "pack." And it's great fun for them. Sometimes their fighting and "attacks" on us appear frighteningly fierce but to them, it's just a game. Much like a group of kids playing make-believe games and pretending to be grown-ups, puppies have their own games and pretend to be "grown-ups," too!

A dog's ability to control the force of his biting is called "bite inhibition." It's a critically important skill that every puppy needs to learn, the earlier the better. At first, they don't know their own strength nor how sharp their little teeth really are. Puppies learn to control the force of their biting from the reactions of their mothers and littermates during play and especially play-fighting.

We can teach puppies about bite inhibition, too, but some of the methods most often recommended aren't effective. Mother dogs' methods, however, are very effective, often more so than ours. I believe this is because they're speaking to their pups in the language they understand best -- dog language! A baby puppy is much too busy learning how to be a dog to take time to understand our human words and ways. That takes time and maturity. Puppies respond to dog language in a very powerful, instinctive way. We can take advantage of that by copying a mother dog's actions and using them for ourselves.

The idea of using mother dog's natural training techniques isn't new. Respected trainers like Carol Lea Benjamin have been using them for years. To understand these methods, let's take a look at a typical mother dog disciplining her brood. We'll use my Heather (Chow) and her four rowdy puppies as an example.

When a playful puppy bites Heather hard enough to hurt, she squeals in shocked indignation. The puppy, surprised at her reaction, usually hesitates a moment, unsure of himself, then tries to bite again. Heather yelps even louder this time and whirls on the puppy, growling, showing her teeth and scowling at him fiercely. Then she turns her back on him and storms away, completely ignoring him and any further attempts to get her to play. A smart puppy picks up her clear message quickly: "if you can't play nice, I won't play with you at all!"

If the puppy persists or doesn't take the hint, Heather doesn't fool around. With a menacing growl and using her teeth, she grabs him by the scruff of his neck and gives him a shake. If he sasses back, she gives him another little shake, tougher this time. She doesn't let go of the pup till he's acknowledged her authority (in dog language) by relaxing his body, laying his ears back and keeping still for a moment. Heather disciplines especially obnoxious puppies by knocking them over with her paw and pinning them to the ground, growling angrily and pinching them with her teeth. The puppies shriek but they're not really hurt. She doesn't let them up again untill they relax and lie still. After the correction, the puppy shakes his fur back into place and goes off in search of a playmate with a better sense of humor.

We don't have to growl at our puppies or shake them with our teeth, but we can modify Heather's technique for ourselves. The next time your puppy bites you, scream "OW!" in a high-pitched voice. Exaggerate a little. Then refuse to play with him or pay attention to him for a few minutes. If he doesn't get the message, give him a little scruff shake and scold him in a low-toned, threatening voice. You can exaggerate a little on that, too! Sound meaner than you really are. For puppies that just won't quit or seem to get wilder with every correction, flip them over on their backs, scold them in that same low, scary voice (growling) and gently but firmly, hold them in that position until they stop struggling.

We sometimes give puppies the wrong message about biting by some of the games we play with them. Wrestling and tug of war can encourage a puppy to bite and make it hard for him to distinguish when it's okay to use his teeth and when it's not. To make it easier for your puppy to learn good manners, it's a good idea to avoid these games.

Puppies seem to learn a great deal about bite inhibition and authority between five and eight weeks of age through play with their mothers and littermates. This is an especially good reason not to buy very young puppies. Puppies that were acquired earlier need to be taught these important things by their owners. They might require a little more intense use of Heather's methods than puppies that stayed with their litters longer. Puppies that receive little or no training in bite inhibition, either from their mothers or their people, may grow up to develop behavior problems.

I noticed that Heather picked out certain puppies for a little "extra" correction two or three times a day. She'd roll them over, pin them down for no apparent reason, growling at them if they didn't lie quietly. I noticed, too, that the puppies she chose were the most outgoing and dominant in the litter. She gave them regular reminders of her authority and the behavior she expected from them. I've found that using her technique myself works very well on puppies that've become too big for their britches!

Even with their mothers, puppies act a lot like kids -- they're always testing and pushing their limits. They have angel days and devil days. With patience, persistence and a few hints from your puppy's mother, you'll be able to tip the balance toward the angel's side!

More on kids and dogs is available in the article: Kids And Dogs: Safety first and Vicki DeGruy's award-winning column: Kids and Dogs: A common sense approach.

Vicki DeGruy
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for more great info. I have tryed to pin him on his back, not with much success. but he will calm down. When he gets up again he continues to bite. When i pay no attention to him he starts to jump up and bite what ever He can get a hold of. :twisted:
but i will keep on plugging. Thank again for the info
 

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When he bites growl a harsh "NO!"Then put him in another room, like a bathroom or a closet, somewhere dark and lonely for about 5 minutes. If you push on him etc, it has now become a game....Just isolate him every single time he does it ,and he will learn quickly that biting is unacceptable.
 

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I have found that when puppies mouth the most effective thing you can do is stop play or 'ignore'. Sometimes when they're over stimulated 'no bite' and other action type commands just stimulate more play.

JMO
Paula
 

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if you want to stop jake biting , in short order, "yelping" at him or ignoring him are not going to cut it. yes some puppies will eventually grow out of this behaviour but others only escalate.
next time jake bites you, offer your hand up. then take the scruff of jakes neck and force your hand into his mouth. hold his head, with your hand firmly "jammed" into the back of his mouth for a few minutes as he tries to dislodge your hand, then let him go. it will take a few goes but if EVERY time jake bites you this is the reaction he gets he WILL stop biting you. once you remove your hand you can offer jake a toy to play with.

and for those that think this is "to cruel" or to "extreme" truthfully , i don't wanna hear it. if you don't like the method don't try it. it is proven and it works but you have to be consistant.
 

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attitude said:
if you want to stop jake biting , in short order, "yelping" at him or ignoring him are not going to cut it. yes some puppies will eventually grow out of this behaviour but others only escalate.
next time jake bites you, offer your hand up. then take the scruff of jakes neck and force your hand into his mouth. hold his head, with your hand firmly "jammed" into the back of his mouth for a few minutes as he tries to dislodge your hand, then let him go. it will take a few goes but if EVERY time jake bites you this is the reaction he gets he WILL stop biting you. once you remove your hand you can offer jake a toy to play with.

and for those that think this is "to cruel" or to "extreme" truthfully , i don't wanna hear it. if you don't like the method don't try it. it is proven and it works but you have to be consistant.
It works like a charm! but she's right...consistency is KEY!
 

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attitude said:
if you want to stop jake biting , in short order, "yelping" at him or ignoring him are not going to cut it. yes some puppies will eventually grow out of this behaviour but others only escalate.
next time jake bites you, offer your hand up. then take the scruff of jakes neck and force your hand into his mouth. hold his head, with your hand firmly "jammed" into the back of his mouth for a few minutes as he tries to dislodge your hand, then let him go. it will take a few goes but if EVERY time jake bites you this is the reaction he gets he WILL stop biting you. once you remove your hand you can offer jake a toy to play with.

and for those that think this is "to cruel" or to "extreme" truthfully , i don't wanna hear it. if you don't like the method don't try it. it is proven and it works but you have to be consistant.

Oh goodness gracious! Puppies are just exuberant twits with no sense of bite inhibition. Ignore works very well. Perhaps what people might not understand about ignore is that ignore is not huffiness, dramatic sighs or grumpiness. It is simply stopping play...just stop. Of course it is a free country and you can choose to grab your dog by the scruff and gag him with your hand.... :shock:

Paula
 

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PaulaEdwina said:
attitude said:
if you want to stop jake biting , in short order, "yelping" at him or ignoring him are not going to cut it. yes some puppies will eventually grow out of this behaviour but others only escalate.
next time jake bites you, offer your hand up. then take the scruff of jakes neck and force your hand into his mouth. hold his head, with your hand firmly "jammed" into the back of his mouth for a few minutes as he tries to dislodge your hand, then let him go. it will take a few goes but if EVERY time jake bites you this is the reaction he gets he WILL stop biting you. once you remove your hand you can offer jake a toy to play with.

and for those that think this is "to cruel" or to "extreme" truthfully , i don't wanna hear it. if you don't like the method don't try it. it is proven and it works but you have to be consistant.

Oh goodness gracious! Puppies are just exuberant twits with no sense of bite inhibition. Ignore works very well. Perhaps what people might not understand about ignore is that ignore is not huffiness, dramatic sighs or grumpiness. It is simply stopping play...just stop. Of course it is a free country and you can choose to grab your dog by the scruff and gag him with your hand.... :shock:

Paula
as i said if you don't like the method don't use it.
i understand the word "ignore" not illiterate, thanks.
you try your method with working dogs and see how quickly you change your methods
even tho puppies explore the world with their mouths they need to be taught boundaries, black and white.
 

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What attitude says to do is not cruel in any way. it works and doesn't harm the dog. Just because it sounds a little too hands on doesn't mean it doesn't work. and if you have a dominant dog, the ignore tactics won't help you much, and this will cause larger problems. If people were willing to be more aggressive when dealing with their dogs behavioural problems, we wouldn't have so many messed up, unwanted, aggressive dogs in shelters.

**EDIT TO ADD - Dogs are not people, they are animals. You can't expect them to reason with you. they are arrogant and do what they want, until and unless you teach them otherwise.
 

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attitude said:
PaulaEdwina said:
attitude said:
if you want to stop jake biting , in short order, "yelping" at him or ignoring him are not going to cut it. yes some puppies will eventually grow out of this behaviour but others only escalate.
next time jake bites you, offer your hand up. then take the scruff of jakes neck and force your hand into his mouth. hold his head, with your hand firmly "jammed" into the back of his mouth for a few minutes as he tries to dislodge your hand, then let him go. it will take a few goes but if EVERY time jake bites you this is the reaction he gets he WILL stop biting you. once you remove your hand you can offer jake a toy to play with.

and for those that think this is "to cruel" or to "extreme" truthfully , i don't wanna hear it. if you don't like the method don't try it. it is proven and it works but you have to be consistant.

Oh goodness gracious! Puppies are just exuberant twits with no sense of bite inhibition. Ignore works very well. Perhaps what people might not understand about ignore is that ignore is not huffiness, dramatic sighs or grumpiness. It is simply stopping play...just stop. Of course it is a free country and you can choose to grab your dog by the scruff and gag him with your hand.... :shock:

Paula
as i said if you don't like the method don't use it.
i understand the word "ignore" not illiterate, thanks.
you try your method with working dogs and see how quickly you change your methods
even tho puppies explore the world with their mouths they need to be taught boundaries, black and white.

1. I did not mean to imply you were illiterate. I truly was trying to point out that people often use 'ignore' improperly. For instance you tell someone to ignore the dog jumping up until he stops, but the person is so frustrated that ignore becomes a huffy kind of arm folding and head tossing or some such - in that case he would still be giving the dog energy as opposed to shutting down the behavior by simply standing still.

2. True enough, my experience has been with rhodesian ridgebacks. They are large, they are stubborn, they have a high energy puppyhood, they are hunting dogs, and they are not programed to do what you ask like GSDs for instance. But they are not bully breeds. However, this kind of feedback training is not dog or breed specific so I do not imagine that it will NOT work on bully breeds.

I have just found along the way that most of the time it is quite unecessary to be so agressive to teach a dog.

Paula
 

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Ive used Attitude's method once before - and it really worked. The only difference is it was an adult dog and I didn't grab his scruff. When they bite and you go to pull your hand (or whatever body part) away, it becomes a game-like tug. What I did was when he grabbed my hand, i'de push my hand further into his mouth - not enough to choke him, but just enough for it to be uncomfortable and tell him "No Bite". When he let go, i'de stuff a toy into his mouth. He learned pretty quickly not to use his mouth on me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
WOW so many help full things. I have tried the ignoring thing and I doesn’t work. So I will give the other one a try. I do not believe in hitting Jake and or choking. So no need to worry here. I also have tried to isolate him. Jake is very stubborn, he will wait it out and come out biting again. So on with the scruff.
Stay tune......and thanks
 

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**EDIT TO ADD - Dogs are not people, they are animals. You can't expect them to reason with you. they are arrogant and do what they want, until and unless you teach them otherwise.[/quote]

What I've learned over the process of training a few dogs is that there are many methods to training and none of them have anything to do with expecting to reason with a dog like it's a human. Also many of these training methods are applicable across the board to man or beast - operant conditioning being one of them.

And for the record dogs are not being arrogant when they don't do what you want. As you pointed out, they're another creature all together - arrogance is a human quality. They just don't understand what your expectations are and it is up to you to train them, and most of the time it doesn't require violence.

Paula
 

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I second attitude's post...her method works very well on the bullies. Having worked with many different breeds, I can tell you first hand that they are way mouthier than the average dog. They love to bite and bite hard. Attitudes method has worked the best overall for me with the bullies.
 

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for me what has worked so far, i flick him on his nose. he stops but only for a minute or so! attitudes tactic seems harsh, but then again so does flicking his nose! but i will wait on that since he is still little. he is almost 4 months and only 17 lbs.
 
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