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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
to every one who read my post ok my dogs a mutt but i dont care i wouldent trade her for anything in the world id rather have a small pit bull. when i post some pictures youll understand she might be a mutt but shes still very unique.
 

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we understand that you love your dog! We all love our dogs, mutts or purebred. Doesn't mean we should go about breeding them and making up new "designer mutts"
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
maybe not but one of the reasons i wanted to breed her is every one who sees her asks me if im going to because they want one if i do but its jus a thought and im not talking new breed just one litterthen im getting her fixed.
 

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Everyone asks me the same thing about my dog and she is already fixed. She even has a birth defect that could possibly be passed on to her offspring if she had them. But people like that... they acutally want me to breed a defected dog when there are so many "mixed" and "special" dogs in the shelter already.

Are these just random people you see on the street when you walk her? if so, how are you going to be able to know if these dogs are acutally going to good home or if these people are actutally going to keep them. They may just want them for a year then realize its too tough and give them up.

I bet theres a mix just like your dog sitting in a shelter somewhere and you having that litter gives that dog even less of a chance of being adopted
 

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Kate said:
Everyone asks me the same thing about my dog and she is already fixed. She even has a birth defect that could possibly be passed on to her offspring if she had them. But people like that... they acutally want me to breed a defected dog when there are so many "mixed" and "special" dogs in the shelter already.

Are these just random people you see on the street when you walk her? if so, how are you going to be able to know if these dogs are acutally going to good home or if these people are actutally going to keep them. They may just want them for a year then realize its too tough and give them up.

I bet theres a mix just like your dog sitting in a shelter somewhere and you having that litter gives that dog even less of a chance of being adopted
Kate looks perfect to me what is wrong with her? (I am not saying breed just asking) OP breeding is a lot more work than you probably know or your boyfriend..The list of things that could and frequently do wrong goes on and on. If nothing else that is resaon enough for me not to breed...Cleaning up 6 puppies poop, Mom can't breast feed and you have to do it every two hours, Mom dies during delivery, She does not deliver them all and she has to have sugery etc.........Plus who is to say that the puppies will get all of the assests of the two breeds? And what makes you think that the puppies will look like your dog? Even the pros have odd balls pop up while breeding it takes years to achieve a consistant look bc that sounds like what you are going for................Anyways welcome to the board and you must post a picture of your dog I bet she is cute!!!!!! I have a Chihuahua so they have a special place in my heart
 

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So you want to breed your dog......

"Let's think about this for a minute. So you want to breed your female. You know what to expect if everything goes right. Your little girl will present you with little bundles of joy. She will lovingly nurse them and care for them until they are old enough to be weaned.

You and your family will find great joy in watching and playing with these little dolls, and then when the time is right they will all (or maybe you keep just one) go off to special homes to live out their lives as cherished
companions. But have you given consideration to what if something goes wrong? I have listed here a few of the problems that I myself have personal knowledge of. Everything listed has happened either to me or someone I know.

These are not isolated incidents. I'm sure others could add miles to my list. Learn by the mistakes of others. Leave the breeding to those who REALLY know what they are doing, have the experience and know what to expect.

What if during the breeding............

1) The stud dog you have chosen is carrying a venereal disease and gives it to your female. She not only doesn't conceive but you have to pay the vet bills to get her infection cleared up and she is now sterile.

2) The stud dog you decided to breed your darling to is not experienced. Once the two dogs are joined tightly in a tie, he decides to chase the neighbors cat out of his yard. He bolts for the cat ripping his penis loose and causing your b-witch to hemorrhage from within.

3) Your modest girl decides she doesn't want the attentions of this gigolo mutt chosen for her without her consent. She snaps at him catching her tooth on his loose cheek and rips it open sending blood flying everywhere. He
retaliates by sinking his teeth into her left eye.

4) You leave your dog with the wner of the male dog because the breeding is not going very swiftly. In fact, it's been three hours and nothing is happening. The stud owner leaves the two dogs alone in the backyard. The dogs get out through a tiny hole in the fence and a truck hits your female.

5) You pay the stud fee up front figuring you will make that and more back when the pups sell. The owner of the male guarantees the stud service to work or you can come back again. Well into the gestation time you discover your b-witch isn't pregnant and you now must wait another 4 months for her to come back in heat in order to try again. Of course it doesn't work again, so in another 4 months you take your dog to another male and risk loosing another stud fee.

6) You get her bred. Bring her home. She bothers you so you let her out (she is still in heat and still receptive to males). You here a commotion outside there is your girl tied up with the neighborhood mutt. When she whelps there will need to be DNA tests done on the pups.

7) You get her bred. Bring her home. Let her out. (She is still in heat and receptive to other males) but you do not see the neighborhood mutt breed her. The pups are born but look very odd. You call the stud owner he suggests
DNA testing (at your expense). You have a litter of mutts!. What do you do about the ones you have already sold?.

Or, knowing she tied with the neighborhood mutt you decide to terminate the pregnancy and try again being more careful next time. But a few weeks later your female is very sick because you had her given a miss-mate shot which has caused a hormonal imbalance which in turn caused a uterine infection and now she has Pyometra and needs a complete hysterectomy. All plans of getting a litter
is gone and your females' life is now in danger if she does not have the operation.

What if during the birth..............

1) The puppies are too large for the female. She never goes into labor, the puppies die and she becomes infected by the decaying bodies.

2) The puppies are coming breech and they drown in their own sacks before they can be born.

3) The first puppy is large and breech. When it starts coming your female starts screaming, and before you can stop her she reaches around, grabs the puppy in her teeth and yanks it out killing it instantly.

4) A puppy gets stuck. Neither your female nor you can get it out. You have to race her to the vet. The vet can't get it out either. She has to have an emergency caesarian section of course it is 3:00 am Christmas Day.

5) A puppy is coming out breech and dry (the water sack that protects them has burst). It gets stuck. Mom tries to help it out by clamping her teeth over one of the back legs. The head and shoulders are firmly caught. Mom pulls on the leg, hard, peeling the flesh from the leg and leaving a
wiggling stump of bone.

6) A dead puppy gets stuck in the birth canal, but your female is well into hard labor. She contracts so hard trying to give birth that her uterus ruptures and she bleeds to death on the way to the vet.

What if directly after birth..........

1) The mother has no idea what to do with a puppy and she drops them out and walks away, leaving them in the sack to drown.

2) The mother takes one look at the puppies, decides they are disgusting droppings and tries to smother them in anything she can find to bury them .

3) The mother gets too enthusiastic in her removal of the placenta and umbilical cord, and rips the cord out leaving a gushing hole pulsing blood all over you as you try in vain to stop the bleeding.

4) Or, she pulls on the cords so hard she disembowels the puppies as they are born and you have a box full of tiny, kicking babies with a tangle of guts the size of a walnut hanging from their stomachs. Of course all the babies must be put to sleep.

5) What if because of some Hormone deficiency she turns vicious allowing no-one near her or the babies, who she refuses to nurse, or you have to interfere with.

6) You notice something protruding from her vagina when you let her out to pee. You take her to the vet to discover a prolapsed uterus, which needs to be removed.

What if when you think you are in the clear..................

1) One or more of the puppies inhaled fluid during birth, pneumonia develops and death occurs within 36 hours.

2) what if the mothers milk goes bad. You lose three of your four puppies before you discover what is wrong. You end up bottle feeding the remaining pup every two hours, day and night. After three days the puppy fades from
infection and dies.

3) The puppies develop fading puppy syndrome you lose two. You bottle-feed or tube feed the last remaining baby. It begins to choke and despite your efforts to clear the airway, the pup stiffens and dies in your hands.

4) Your female develops mastitis and her breast ruptures.

5) Your female develops a uterine infection from a retained placenta. Her temperature soars to 105. You race her to the vet, he determines she must be spayed. He does the spay in an attempt to save her life, you pay the hundreds of dollars bill. The infection has gone into her blood stream.
The infected milk kills all the puppies and the b-witch dies a day later.

6) All the puppies are fine but following the birth the female develops a hormone imbalance. She becomes a fear biter and anytime anyone tries to touch her she viciously attacks them.

7) Mom and pups seem fine, the puppies are four weeks old and are at their cutest. However, one day one of the puppies disappears. You search everywhere but you can't find it. A few days later another puppy is gone. And another. You can't figure how on earth the puppies are getting out of their safe 4' x 4' puppy pen. Finally there is only one puppy left. The next morning you find the mother chomping contentedly on what is left of the last puppy she herself killed.

What if the new homes are not so happy?.......................

1) You give a puppy to a friend. Their fence blows down so they tie the puppy outside while they go to work. A roving dog comes along and kills the puppy. Your friend calls you up to tell you about the poor little puppy and asks when you are having more puppies.

2) You sell a puppy to an acquaintance. The next time you see them you ask how the puppy is doing. They tell you that it soiled their new carpet so they took it to the pound

3) You sell a puppy to a friend (you give them a good price and payments). They make a couple of tiny payments. Six months later they move to an apartment. They ask you to take it back. You take it back and of course even the tiny payments stop. The dog they returned is so shy, and ill mannered from lack of socialization and training it takes you a year of work providing socializing and training to be able to give it away.

4) You sell a puppy to a wonderful home. They love her like one of the family. At a vet check done by their vet it is determined that the puppy has a heart murmur. (Your vet found nothing when he checked the puppy before it was sold.) They love their puppy and want the best for her. They have an expensive surgery done. The puppy is fine. They sue you for the medical costs. They win, because you did not have a contract stipulating conditions of guarantee and so as breeder you are responsible for the puppy's genetic health.

5) You give a puppy to your mother. she is thrilled. Two years later the puppy starts developing problems. It begins to develop odd symptoms and is suffering. Hundreds and hundreds of dollars worth of tests later it is finally discovered that the dog is suffering from a terminal condition that was inherited, possibly from your female since you know nothing about her family lines.

6) One loving home decides your puppy is un-trainable, destructive and wants to return the pup and get a full refund, which you have spent on your vet bills.

7) One loving couple calls you and is very upset because their pup has crippling hip dysplasia and want to know what you are going to do about it. You have spayed your female so a replacement is out of the question, lookslike another big refund.

The Sale:...................

1) You put your ad in the local paper for your pups at the usual price and get only 2 responses and no sales. You cut the pup's price in half and broaden your advertising to 3 other newspapers in which the advertising totals $120.00 a week.

2) You get a few more puppy inquiries from people who ask all about health testing you did before breeding and if the pups are registered with AKC. You tell them your dogs are healthy and it was enough and that you could get the papers. The callers politely thank you and hang up.

3) The pups are now 4 months old and getting bigger, eating a lot and their barking is really beginning to annoy the neighbors who call the police who inform you of the $150.00 noise by-law.

4) Your neighbors also call the humane society who comes out to inspect the care of your dogs. You pass inspection but end up feeling stressed and harassed.

5) You finally decide to give the rest of the litter away but still have to pay the $1200.00 advertising bill and the $600.00 vet bill.

So you gotta ask yourself: Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, "breeder?"."


_________________
 

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That does help a little, but it still is no guarentee at all. Tell them to go rescue one instead. It will be so much more gratifiying to them.

Oh one thing I forgot. Read this ALL please and tell if just one liter is worth it:

Edit: lol oops, someone beat it to it posting right above me
 

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Even if you breed your little dog to a small male pit, there is no guarantee they'll all be that small. I've been asked several times if I'm going to breed my male, each time I replied with, "No, there are enough unwanted dogs in the shelter." My fiance was wanting to breed him, but I convinced him that it would not be a good idea. With all the BSL coming into effect, do you really want to bring puppies into the world that will be euthed because they look like a pit? Here is a story that someone(I think it was Kate) posted a while back:

Dear Backyard Breeder -
I am writing this in a state of anger, frustration, and sadness. I think you will understand why as you read this letter.

About two years ago, you decided to breed a litter of pitbulls. Your bitch wasn't really breeding quality and you certainly didn't know enough about the breed so perhaps it was greed, ignorance, or the desire to show the kids the highly overrated miracle of birth. You managed to find a male of equally undistinguished parentage and the deal was consummated. Your bitch, who had previously been confined to the backyard because she was not housebroken and had absolutely no manners, must have felt like royalty when you allowed her to stay in the garage while she tended her puppies. The puppies received very little handling and only absolutely minimal vet care. After all you had to make money on the litter. You started to panic when the pups were 6 weeks old and prospective buyers were not exactly beating a path to to your door. The price dropped to $75 and the interview for prospective buyers consisted pretty much of "Did you bring cash?".

One lively, playful male was sold to a young couple with a toddler and another child on the way. Any responsible breeder would have known this was a bad placement and would have counseled the couple to wait until the kids were 4 or 5. Maybe you didn't know any better or maybe you just didn't care so you sold them the puppy. Things were okay for a very short time but then the puppy, in his youthful exuberance, was knocking the toddler down and the kid was becoming afraid of him. The parents, novice dog owners without a clue about training, banished the pup to the backyard. Unfortunately he was lonely and started barking and digging. They called you and offered to return him but you said you didn't want him back and that you were getting out of dogs. (Thank goodness!) They ran an ad in the paper...free to good home but they were pretty lenient on the interpretation of good home.

A young man took the puppy. He saw this free, AKC registered dog as a way to make extra money standing the dog at stud. I guess the income wasn't that great or the guy spent it too quickly. The dog was hit by a car. The owner neglected to get veterinary care until 5 days later and only did so because the leg was all swollen and the dog was in severe pain. When the vet told him how much the treatment would cost the owner said to euthanize the dog. The vet thought the dog was too sweet to kill so she called someone in rescue. This person paid for the treatment and took the dog home to heal. When the dog was healed and no adopters were forthcoming she called me and I took the dog to foster.

He really liked living here. I taught him some basic manners and he got to watch TV in the evenings. He liked playing with my dogs. When a good possibility of a home came along, I adopted him out. Things were fine for the first 2 days but then he started to show unpredictable aggression, not to the adopters, but to guests or people they encountered when walking him. They reluctantly returned him to me. I did more socialization and then got another rescue person to take him for a week and see what kind of results he got. Same story. The dog was fine for a very short time and then began displaying unpredictable aggression. I took him back knowing that the only alternative now was to put him down. A dog with unpredictable aggression is just not a candidate for placement. We have so many more dogs looking for homes than there are homes available that resources cannot be spent on a dog with unsatisfactory temperament.

So, Backyard Breeder, you produced this dog and then abandoned all responsibility for him. I took him to the vet yesterday. He knew something was wrong...probably because I was crying and my hands were shaking. I knew I had to do this but I really liked this dog and hated that this was the way it would end. I held him in my arms as he drifted off. There is no more confusion and instability in his young life and now he has playmates at the Rainbow Bridge. I know that for at least the time he lived here he was happy and well-cared for. I can't help thinking that if you had been more selective of buyers and if his owners had been more responsible and provided him with care and training he wouldn't have had to die. Maybe it was genetic. Perhaps his parents had aggression problems and you never considered that when you bred the litter. I don't know. I just know that I wish you could feel as bad as I do over this.

I suppose the irresponsible people who owned him along the way have to share the blame too. The young couple bought on impulse without doing any research into the breed. They didn't train him and then just gave him away when he became inconvenient. The young man who let him suffer before seeking vet care should never own another pet. But by and large, Backyard Breeder, I blame you because you made a conscientious decision to create life and then refused to take responsibility for what you had created.

Angrily yours,

A Rescue Worker
 

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angie7349 said:
[Kate looks perfect to me what is wrong with her? (I am not saying breed just asking)
Her tail is like an EB's. Her and her sister were born like that so the breeder sold them for half price to my friend.


Oh and to minipit.... please talk to Sajoseph. Her little girl had a litter and one of the pups came out with a very sad condition that she might have to be put to sleep for. It is possibe to be treated though, but it will cost at least $2,000 to have it done
 

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Studies show that virtually the entire pet overpopulation problem stems from the "just one litter" mentality. Every day, litters are turned into the pound, the Humane Society and rescue organizations because the owners could find homes for them. Just go to www.petfinder.com and enter a search for puppies…see for yourself just how many are for adoption through humane societies and rescues! And those don’t include the thousands that are being put down every year because the humane societies and rescues are full!

As far as your dog being so "unique", have you been to your local animal shelter lately? They are filled with cute and unique dogs--most with only a few days left to live. Even breeding two purebred animals rarely results in offspring that are exactly like of the parents. With mixed breeds, it is virtually impossible to have offspring that are exactly like one of the parents
 

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The other thing is of course that breeding a mix gives no garauntee of the pups. They can be anything their little genes desire. So you might think your mix is the cat's meow but there is no way to garauntee you will produce another perfet mix.

Paula
 

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Another article to back up what Kasco said:

SOMETIMES THERE'S JUST TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING . . .
then there's a problem. In the case of dogs and cats, it's the problem of pet overpopulation. Each year, more than 12,000,000 dogs, cats, puppies, and kittens are left at animal shelters around the country. Some are lost, some are abandoned, some are unwanted, most are the result of irresponsible pet ownership. Sadly, nearly 8,000,000 of those animals have to be euthanatized because there aren't enough homes for them all.

CONSIDER THESE FACTS:

In six short years, one female dog and its offspring can be the source of 67,000 puppies.

In just seven years, one female cat and its young can produce 420,000 cats.

Every day in the United States, more than 70,000 puppies and kittens are bom. When this number is compared to the 10,000 human births each day, it's clear that there can never be enough homes for all these pets. But don't look at it as just a problem of numbers--every single pet is an individual life.

WHAT DOES PET-OVERPOPULATION HAVE TO DO WITH ME?
just about everything. It's hard to imagine that letting your pet have one--or even two--litters causes a problem, especially if you find homes for most of the puppies or kittens. But the fact is that "just one litter" does cause pet overpopulation. In less than a year, all of the little ones in your pet's litter could be having litters of their own. Every day, thousands of healthy puppies and kittens must be destroyed--and each one of those thousands came from "just one litter."

PET OVERPOPULATION IS A PROBLEM YOU CAN HELP SOLVE
Fortunately, there is a solution to pet overpopulation. It's a routine surgical procedure for your pet called spaying or neutering. Being a responsible pet owner means making this important choice for your pet--a choice that saves lives. Talk to your veterinarian about spaying and neutering. Prevent a litter and be a part of the solution to the tragedy of pet overpopulation.

WHAT DO "SPAY" AND "NEUTER" REALLY MEAN?
Your veterinarian can fully explain spay and neuter procedures to you and discuss with you the best age at which to sterilize your pet. Basically, female dogs and cats are "spayed" by removing their reproductive organs, and male dogs and cats are "neutered" by removing both testicles. In both cases, an operation is performed while the animal is under anesthesia. Sometimes the pet can go home the same day, and other times a stay at your veterinarian is required. Depending upon the procedure, your pet may need stitches removed after a few days.

PREVENT A LITTER: IT'S GOOD FOR YOUR PET

Spayed and neutered dogs and cats live longer, healthier lives.

Spaying and neutering can eliminate or reduce the incidence of a number of health problems that can be very difficult or expensive to treat.

Spaying female dogs and cats eliminates the possibility of uterine or ovarian cancer and greatly reduces the incidence of breast cancer, particularly when your pet is spayed before the first estrous cycle.

Neutering male dogs reduces the incidence of prostate cancer and prostate disorders.


PREVENT A LITTER: IT'S GOOD FOR YOU

Spayed and neutered pets are better, more affectionate companions.

Neutered cats are less likely to spray and mark territory.

Spaying a female dog or cat eliminates its heat cycle. Estrus lasts an average of six to twelve days, often twice a year, in dogs, and an average of six to seven days, three or more times a year, in cats. Females in heat can cry incessantly, show nervous behavior, and attract unwanted male animals.

Spayed and neutered pets are less likely to bite. Unaltered animals often exhibit more behavior and temperament problems than do those that have been spayed or neutered.

Neutered males are less likely to roam the neighborhood, run away, or get into fights.

PREVENT A LITTER: IT'S GOOD FOR THE COMMUNITY
Communities spend millions of dollars to control and eliminate unwanted animals. Irresponsible breeding contributes to the problem of dog bites and attacks. Animal shelters are overburdened with surplus animals. Stray pets and homeless animals get into trash containers, defecate in public areas or on private lawns, and frighten or anger citizens who have no understanding of their misery or needs. Some stray animals also scare away or kill birds and wildlife.

SPAY AND NEUTER: EXCUSES, MYTHS ... AND FACTS
"My pet will get fat and lazy." The truth is that most pets get fat and lazy because their owners feed them too much and don't give them enough exercise.

"It's better to have one litter first." Medical evidence indicates just the opposite. In fact, the evidence shows that females spayed before their first heat are typically healthier. Check with your veterinarian about the appropriate time for these procedures.


"But my pet is a purebred." So is at least one out of every four animals brought to animal shelters around the country. There are just too many dogs and cats--mixed breed and purebred.

"I want my dog to be protective." Spaying and neutering does not affect a dog's natural instincts to protect its home and family. A dog's personality is formed more by genetics and environment than by its sex hormones.

"I don't want my male dog or cat to feel like less of a male." Pets don't have any concept of sexual identity or ego. Neutering a male dog or cat will not change its basic personality. It doesn't suffer any kind of emotional reaction or identity crisis when neutered.

"It's too expensive to have my pet spayed or neutered." The cost of spaying and neutering depends on the sex, size, and age of the animal, your veterinarian's fees, and a number of other variables. But whatever the actual price, spay or neuter surgery is a one-time cost and relatively small when compared to all the benefits. It's also a bargain compared to the cost of having a litter and ensuring the health of the mother and litter; two months of pregnancy and another two months until the litter is weaned can add up to significant veterinary bills and food costs, not to mention the added financial and health costs if complications develop. Most importantly, it's a very small price to pay for the health of your pet and the prevention of more unwanted animals.

"I'll find good homes for all the puppies and kittens." You may find homes for all, or at least most, of your pet's litter. What you may not think about is that, in less than one year's time, each and every one of your pet's litter may have produced its own litter, adding more and more animals to the population. The problem of pet overpopulation is made and perpetuated one litter at a time.

Information provided by:
The Humane Society of the United States
2100 L Street, NW
Washington, DC 20037

http://www.huntington-indiana.com/humane/just_one_litter.htm
 

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Tasha, great post!! I have actually never read that before! So to give credit where credit is due I wish I knew who had posted that!
 

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Kate said:
Tasha, great post!! I have actually never read that before! So to give credit where credit is due I wish I knew who had posted that!
Ah, I thought it was you. I wonder who posted it first then. I just googled it.
 

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Kate said:
That does help a little, but it still is no guarentee at all. Tell them to go rescue one instead. It will be so much more gratifiying to them.

Oh one thing I forgot. Read this ALL please and tell if just one liter is worth it:

Edit: lol oops, someone beat it to it posting right above me
:oops: sorry :oops:
 

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Kelly said:
Kate said:
That does help a little, but it still is no guarentee at all. Tell them to go rescue one instead. It will be so much more gratifiying to them.

Oh one thing I forgot. Read this ALL please and tell if just one liter is worth it:

Edit: lol oops, someone beat it to it posting right above me
:oops: sorry :oops:
geez what were you thinking :wink: lol it just shows we are on top of things around here! Just looking out for our dogs
 

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UNIQUE , you want to breed because your dog is unique.Hello..........All the dogs on this forum are unique in there own way but you don't see any of us running out to breed our unique dog :x Please read everything in this thread,you really want to put your " Unique" dog through this
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
so ill let my boy friend read that stuff maybe it will convince him. I never realy wanted to I want to get her fixed soon its a pain just dealing with hers eversy 6 months or so if you know what i mean.
 

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minipit said:
so ill let my boy friend read that stuff maybe it will convince him. I never realy wanted to I want to get her fixed soon its a pain just dealing with hers eversy 6 months or so if you know what i mean.
Good luck with that! :)
 
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