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Discussion Starter #1
Well, it looks like BanterBulls 2 year young Bully is coming to live with me :D l'm terribly excited, & I'm going to use the time until his arrival to learn as much as I can about training deaf dogs.
Shawn mentioned I should have in my mind what the pack heirchy will be, so that I may enforce it to help smooth the ranks. How on earth do I decide who gets to be "top dog"? Harley & Bully are almost exactly the same age which should work out perfect. I would imagine Bully will have the weight advantage, since he's the male. Also, there is is hearing impairment to consider. Should the fact that Harley was here first come into play at all? Once they start playing rough, which I'm sure will happen, will it be more difficult for them to accept what I've decreed if the weaker dog is supposed to be alpha? I'd love to hear your opinions on this.
Also, I plan to introduce them at a neutral location, there's a fully fenced in park that is always deserted that should work nicely.
Any other advice ideas, whatever would be greatly appreciated!
I'm going to get the book "Living With a Deaf Dog" by Susan Cope Becker. Has anyone ever heard of her?
 

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nanniesrock said:
Also, I plan to introduce them at a neutral location, there's a fully fenced in park that is always deserted that should work nicely.
I can't help you other then in this area. Remember, no face to face introduction, that can easily bring on a challenge. I suggest a walk with them together and not letting them sniff each other except from a distance of one on one side of you and the other on the other side. Then after a good long walk and they are tired out, then the real sniffing can work.

With Kate and Page, there was no alpha/dominant dog. They both ate at the same time and when they were playing, both took on the dominant role. Granted they both werent bullys anddddd I'm sure that was a very rare case, but I would take things slow with trying to make the pack order and see if things just naturally happen
 

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Well, with my four, they dictate what is what. I think you just have to sit back and watch them and see if either is wanting to be an alpha. Sometimes one dog will recognize that there is a problem with another dog and be compassionate for it. Being that Bully is a male puppy, Harley may take on a mother role to him. This has happened more than once. The thing would be not to leave them unsupervised. BTW dogs learn hand signals very quickly, If you think about it, when we are teaching verbal commands, most of the time we are using hand signals too. If we are watching a movie on TV and I do not want to interrupt it with talking I have pointed to a dog and made a lay down sign and they lay down. Dogs are smart. Good luck and start studying. :D
 

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Seniority, whether age, or who was "here first" definately needs to count. Other than that, I'd let them work it out to an extent too. The dog we brought in 1st here, THINKS he is the alpha, but so does Copper, the doxie and he was 2nd to the last! It's more up to you than the dogs to an extent - but if letting the new dog become alpha works out and there's no problems, let that occur. If the resident dogs wants to retain their status as alpha, or at least assert it, let that happen however and discourage the new dogs attempts to overthrow it and assume alpha position.
In short, watch and see, and if necessary, intervene. Hopefully one will be submissive and make the choice easy for you!
On the 3rd(?) hand, my deaf Mini Aussie pays little attention to alpha status and in fact has many alpha behaviors. It's like she misses many of the other dogs' cues. But we manage to keep peace here regardless (we don't own bullies, just foster occasionally though!) for the most part! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I probably should have posted, I'm told Bully is aggressive with dogs outside his pack, Harley has always been submissive (although slightly less so on her home turf). I'm also told Bully can get "upset" when the other dog(s) seek attention/ affection. This is the part I'm really concerned with. Harley is always at my feet, and receives a lot of attention. I have plenty of love for them both, but some advice on how to handle it if this crops up would help.
 

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nanniesrock said:
I probably should have posted, I'm told Bully is aggressive with dogs outside his pack, Harley has always been submissive (although slightly less so on her home turf). I'm also told Bully can get "upset" when the other dog(s) seek attention/ affection. This is the part I'm really concerned with. Harley is always at my feet, and receives a lot of attention. I have plenty of love for them both, but some advice on how to handle it if this crops up would help.

Well, I still think you are going to need to take a wait and see plan. Just do not let them alone together. Bully is still a pup trying to prove himself, so some of this can be handled through basic training. If he sees Harley as a mama dog figure, he may not push her at all.

BTW here is another thread on deaf dogs in case you missed it:

http://bulldogbreeds.com/discuss/viewtopic.php?t=10080
 

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Maternal is not a word I would use to describe Harely, hopefully she might get that way. She was spayed young, so that may play a part. I think she may never have even had her first heat. (I'm guessing here) Her nipples never descended.
I was thinking maybe I could use a little Cesar Millan methodology & feed or otherwise reward whoever is in the most calm-submissive state of mind first. I just read a post by ultimateK9 suggesting (s)he uses that method.
"you never get a second chance to make a first impression" Why am I so afraid I'm gonna screw this up?
 

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nanniesrock said:
Maternal is not a word I would use to describe Harely, hopefully she might get that way.


:lol: Well, the first of the four dogs that we have, was not really maternal either. She
was all about herself and still is for that matter. We got her at the age of 4 months in the
month of February. That following July we got Holly :grommit: and the sole purpose for getting Holly
was so that she could be Sasha's friend. They got along great but it has always been
Holly that took to Sasha, Sasha just lapped up the attention. Then one day in August,
we got a kitten and named her Whiskers. :dog: We kept Whiskers seperated from them for
three days, on the third day we saw that the dogs and her were playing footsie under
the door so we knew whe could let her out. We waited until the dogs had laid down and
napping. I let Whiskers out and she slowly manuvered herself in front of the coffee table
and laid down. By this time Sasha had her eyes open watching her. When Whiskers laid
down, Sasha got up and went to her - I thought the kitten would run but she did not. Sasha's
eyes were getting really big as she looked at her and when she got to her, she stuffed her
nose into Whisker's belly and nosed her and sniffed her. In one fell swoop, she picked
Whiskers up by the back of the neck, took her to where she had been laying down, nestled
her and they have been best friends ever since. :love3: It was her maternal instinct that kicked in.
So I will keep my fingers crossed that Harley's wil too. By the way, Sasha and Holly are like best sisters and Sahsa and Rusty are like Husband and Wife and Clara :alien: is like the troubling teen that is messing up the balance. But she is learning their ways and they hers.
:D
 

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It sounds like Bully's main problem is that he thinks he is the alpha. When deciding who should be top dog, Bully or Harley, the answer is easy. Neither! The human is the alpha, dogs are the followers (equal pack members). All five of my dogs are of equal status. They do activities together to help maintain a pack mind set. I walk them all together, feed them side by side, they sleep together, etc.

When introducing them (as said in a previous post) do not bring them face to face. Take them for looooonnnnggg walk together (at least an hour or two). Also, you might want to use a basket muzzle on Bully, at least for the walk, since you don't know how he is going to act. When you get home, start setting the ground rules at the door. They both have to wait for you to enter and then invite them in. Remember everything is yours, and you get to decide what they do and what they get and when they get it. Do not allow Bully free roam. Make him follow your lead. You can invite him into each new room as you come to it, and set up boundaries where you don't want him to go.

I would separate them for a while when you aren't home or paying attention to them. Also, refrain from being to emotional with him for the first couple of weeks. Don't get excited when you meet him, and don't approach him. Make him come to you (you are the alpha), and then ignore him. As Cesar says, "no talk, no touch, no eye contact". Simply take his leash and lead him (make sure is following you not leading you). This walk will help establish your role as leader. Do this first walk without Harley. Once Bully accepts you as the leader, he will be more willing to accept other members of the pack. When they meet correct any dominant or aggressive behavior (i.e. hackles up, tail erect, ears forward, bared teeth, mounting, etc.)

Okay, back to the don't get emotional (excited, affectionate, etc.) with him. He should have to earn everything (as should Harley) affection, food, treats, etc. Dogs to not follow emotional, unstable, norotic, angry, etc. pack leaders. They only follow a calm-assertive, confident pack leader.

Hopefully some of this made sense. Since I am at work and helping customers in between sentences. And I as my husband says "I have the tendency to shift gears without pressing the clutch first".
 
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