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Please Help Us! My 5 year old E.B is in pain. She's been a very healthy dog. Other than excessive shedding, due to stress of new puppy, everything was fine. Then on Memorial Monday, she woke up and could not put ANY wait on front left leg. Vet. checked her out, e-rayed & said Arthritis & bone spurs. How does that happend overnight? The other thing she did for two day was head bobbing (like nodding yes) But she was very alert, and didn't seem to be in pain. In fact was on pain meds. Took her to another Vet. & she said more than likely it was shaking from pain. I'm not a vet. but I don't think it's arthritis. It's been 4 days & still no change. I also do not have the money to keep pumping out. She is my world, can anyone help me? Has anyone heard of this before. Please contact me @ [email protected][/b]
 

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I am sorry to hear that :cry: A friend of mine had a dog that was suddenly and with out warning paralized from the front legs back. She woke up and her dog was dragging her back legs the Vet said that sometimes they pinch nerves jumping around as much as they do..As suddenly as it came it was gone but it did take a little while for the dog te regain all of her strength..... Could that be what is happening?
 

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That's horrible. I am sorry I don't have any advice for you but trust your instincts as it is usually right.I feel you when it comes to $$$$ at the vet but it wouldn't hurt to get a third opinion and then you can compare what all three said and such.Good luck and I hope all works out.
 

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Are you 100% sure your dog is in pain???Reason I am asking is because of my Daizy. I am not saying in any way that THIS is what is wrong. But there is that "voodoo" gene, cerebellum ataxia. Always a future possibility.

Thats why I ask about pain, because it is the cerebellum that is attacked, bringing on the ataxia (wobbly dog can appear to limp in pain at first) the head bobbing is a sign of ataxia.

Daizy nods yes 24/7!Most cases of this are ear related, so Id definatly get her ears checked, not by just any vet, a specialist first off.

Head bobbing is almost always a sign of a nuerological problem starting, but can be a part of a MAJOR problem.
 

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Did you interrogate everyone in the household to see if some sort of trauma (albeit accidental) happened to your dog? Sounds almost like a traumatic injury,.
 

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True, that is what we did. I questioned my oldest son until he was in tears! He always had Daizy on his lap or next to him when she was tiny.

Could very well have been an accident, spinal or head.

Ya know, everything would be so much easier if they could just TALK!
 

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that is so true. i wish sometimes they could talk and tell you where it hurts and what happened.
I hope they figure out what is wrong.
 

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I don't know if WenDthePooh is still on here looking for information on head bobbing but this was just posted on another forum and I thought it might be useful.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/2424...ived+from+a+neurologist+regarding+head+shakes....

Info I received from a neurologist regarding head shakes....
by Cathy & Zimmer

I had sent the video of Zimmer's head shakes to my vet who in turn sent it to a neurologist, Dr. Eric Glass at Red Bank Veterinary here in NJ.

Here is the reply from Dr. Glass:

Thanks for sharing the videotape with us.

The videotape is a classic; the videotape shows a great example of what is referred to as "idiopathic head bobbing syndrome"; we see this most commonly in the bulldog, doberman and boxer although I have seen it in a lab as well as in some mixed breed dogs; the head bobbing can be either up and down or side to side; usually activity, such as concentrating on food or a toy, makes it go away but not always; it can be very episodic in the sense that it may go away for months only to reappear; sometimes it seems to increase in frequency; the exact cause is not known nor is the anatomic dx; we believe strongly it has something to do with the stretch receptors in the neck
- ie the gp or maybe gsa fibers in mm bundles - although this is only a theory; we use to teach that it had something to do with basal nuclei of the brain like parkinsons but that is unlikely.

I have scanned a few dogs but have not found anything as of yet; the good news is that it absolutely does not harm the dog; in fact the dog does not seem to even be bothered at all; it bothers the owners immensely but all you need there is some good client communication; the key with this dz is NOT to treat it as a seizure with anticonvulsants as that absolutely does not work; I unfortunately had to get involved in too many of these cases that are on super high doses of anticonvulsants - one from Penn that almost died -18000K later in their ICU - they came for a second opinion - stopped all the meds and the dog was perfectly fine; we have tried lots of meds to no success but who cares as it does not affect the dog.

I usually tell vets to treat the owner not the dog in these cases as client education is the key.

Dr. DeLahunta, Dr. Kent and I have an article coming out in July compendium on involuntary mvmt disorders - we have described this syndrome in that article.
 
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