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I just picked up my new AB puppy about two weeks ago, and realized there is a problem. The pup would not respond to simple sounds (clapping my hands etc...) I brought him to the vet and she confirmed my suspicions of the pup being deaf. I was wondering if anyone can give me any info on raising a deaf AB. I contacted the breeder and he said he would replace the pup, refund my money or give me another pup with the one I have. But my concern is what it takes to raise a deaf dog and the pup’s best interest. I could care less about the money I just want what is best for the dog, so I am weighing the options and doing the research to see if I am capable of doing what it takes to help this pup.

Any Input Would Be Appreciated
Thank You
 

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Well, I don't have much advise, but I hope you stick with him. Obedience training can be taught with hand signals, which are almost as easily learned as vocal commands. Personally, I don't think it would be all that much more difficult to care for a deaf dog than a dog that could hear. Of course, there would be things that could be more difficult, like calling him to return, and puppy training. I read once that deaf dogs are less likely to stray, and stick around their home and owners. They are more clingy to their owners. I don't know if that's true in every case, it's just something I read in Bully Breeds magazine.
 

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There was a new member who posted last week that found out his pup was blind.
I think the name was Ray Charles? or something like that.
Maybe it's worthwhile chatting with him.... i know being deaf and blind is different... but it's still a disability.

It's a tough question... you've probably already developed a bond with this pup.... hard to give up?!
 

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Welcome to the board! My AB, Rocket, is mostly deaf. At first we thought he was completely deaf, but as time has gone on, we have determined he can hear VERY loud noises when there's no other background noise. Training him has actually gone a lot better than I expected. After he settled into our house and got used to his surroundings, he started watching me VERY closely so he knew what was going on. Obedience training has gone very well...ALL dogs do well with hand signals, not just deaf ones. The biggest issue I have encountered with having a deaf dog is being able to call him when he is out of my sight. In the house, I stomp on the floor and he knows to come look for me...we taught that as a fun game...his natural curiosity would make him want to know where the thumping/vibration was coming from and when he found me, he got a treat. After a few times, he caught on :wink:. I NEVER take him ANYWHERE off-leash...NEVER. It's a good idea to always keep them under your control at all times and not just because he's deaf. One thing a trainer recommended to me is a collar made for deaf dogs that has a 'remote control' and when you need the dogs attention, you push a button and it makes the collar vibrate...this is NOT to be confused with a shock collar...it is NOT a shock collar...it's just a training tool to help the dog know when to come or to look at you.

I was VERY apprehensive when I started realizing Rocket was deaf. I have 4 kids, run a home daycare and I go to school at night. I thought I wouldn't have the time it would require to train him. Things have gone remarkably well and I have to say that it may even be alittle easier to do obedeince training (which every dog needs) with Rocket because he is ALWAYS focused on me. There have been times when things were frustrating, but I believe that's a situation you'll encounter in training ANY dog.

Good luck and let me know if you have anymore questions! :D
 

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Both of my cocker spaniels were deaf by the time they were 6 yrs old. They had major ear problems that led to a loss of hearing. It really wasn't much diferent. I didn't have to worry about them being scared of loud noises and they really didn't bark all that much either. The only thing I had to worry about was if they were sleeping. They would always get startled if you went to pet them when they were sleeping because they wouldn't hear you coming. If you just put your hand in front of their face though, they would smell you and wake up. I think that dogs have such an amazing sense of smell that it sort of makes up for a lack in other senses.
 

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Chico & mom to many thanks for sharing I found your post very interesting! And VSD79 hang in there with that pup. I think you will find him to become a very important part of your life and family, and worth every extra effort. Keep us updated on his growth and developement (please).
 

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mom to many said:
Welcome to the board! My AB, Rocket, is mostly deaf. At first we thought he was completely deaf, but as time has gone on, we have determined he can hear VERY loud noises when there's no other background noise. Training him has actually gone a lot better than I expected. After he settled into our house and got used to his surroundings, he started watching me VERY closely so he knew what was going on. Obedience training has gone very well...ALL dogs do well with hand signals, not just deaf ones. The biggest issue I have encountered with having a deaf dog is being able to call him when he is out of my sight. In the house, I stomp on the floor and he knows to come look for me...we taught that as a fun game...his natural curiosity would make him want to know where the thumping/vibration was coming from and when he found me, he got a treat. After a few times, he caught on :wink:. I NEVER take him ANYWHERE off-leash...NEVER. It's a good idea to always keep them under your control at all times and not just because he's deaf. One thing a trainer recommended to me is a collar made for deaf dogs that has a 'remote control' and when you need the dogs attention, you push a button and it makes the collar vibrate...this is NOT to be confused with a shock collar...it is NOT a shock collar...it's just a training tool to help the dog know when to come or to look at you.

I was VERY apprehensive when I started realizing Rocket was deaf. I have 4 kids, run a home daycare and I go to school at night. I thought I wouldn't have the time it would require to train him. Things have gone remarkably well and I have to say that it may even be alittle easier to do obedeince training (which every dog needs) with Rocket because he is ALWAYS focused on me. There have been times when things were frustrating, but I believe that's a situation you'll encounter in training ANY dog.

Good luck and let me know if you have anymore questions! :D
Wow, nice info.

I feared that Mo would lose his hearing as I heard it was common in white dogs. We taught him hand signals along with the verbal command. He can do almost all of his tricks by the hand signals now. kinda cool. Good luck with the training.
 

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I've had 4 deaf dogs in the past & currently own one now. My best advice is to get a phone number from someone who is knowledable about deaf dogs & their training. They are definitely more work, however what you get in return is worth it. There is sooo much information I could relay to you, but I'd be typing for days. Feel free to pm me with any specific questions/topics & that might make it easier to respond instead of just typing an over general paragraph.

However, my first advice is to go buy a vibrating collar. Many of the shock collars they make have a vibration function to them (instead of a shock). Once trained, that collar not only helps you to get your dog's attention from a distance, but can save your dog's life if he gets loose & runs into the road or such.
 

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cannon said:
mom to many said:
Welcome to the board! My AB, Rocket, is mostly deaf. At first we thought he was completely deaf, but as time has gone on, we have determined he can hear VERY loud noises when there's no other background noise. Training him has actually gone a lot better than I expected. After he settled into our house and got used to his surroundings, he started watching me VERY closely so he knew what was going on. Obedience training has gone very well...ALL dogs do well with hand signals, not just deaf ones. The biggest issue I have encountered with having a deaf dog is being able to call him when he is out of my sight. In the house, I stomp on the floor and he knows to come look for me...we taught that as a fun game...his natural curiosity would make him want to know where the thumping/vibration was coming from and when he found me, he got a treat. After a few times, he caught on :wink:. I NEVER take him ANYWHERE off-leash...NEVER. It's a good idea to always keep them under your control at all times and not just because he's deaf. One thing a trainer recommended to me is a collar made for deaf dogs that has a 'remote control' and when you need the dogs attention, you push a button and it makes the collar vibrate...this is NOT to be confused with a shock collar...it is NOT a shock collar...it's just a training tool to help the dog know when to come or to look at you.

I was VERY apprehensive when I started realizing Rocket was deaf. I have 4 kids, run a home daycare and I go to school at night. I thought I wouldn't have the time it would require to train him. Things have gone remarkably well and I have to say that it may even be alittle easier to do obedeince training (which every dog needs) with Rocket because he is ALWAYS focused on me. There have been times when things were frustrating, but I believe that's a situation you'll encounter in training ANY dog.

Good luck and let me know if you have anymore questions! :D
Wow, nice info.

I feared that Mo would lose his hearing as I heard it was common in white dogs. We taught him hand signals along with the verbal command. He can do almost all of his tricks by the hand signals now. kinda cool. Good luck with the training.

Is Mo a APBT or Amstaff?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Any one have any suggestions on what manufacterer to buy in vibrating collars. There are so many out there and they are not cheap if possible i would like to find one i dont have to replace every year.

Thanks and thanks for replying with yur suggestions its been a stressfull heart breaking situation and I just wanna try my best ,educate myself and get all the right equipment to make sure that my pup gets what he deserves.
 

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Yes, actually PMed Miakoda to ask about the coolars. Hang on & I'll post her response.

http://www.gundogsupply.com/vibration-collars--vibrating-collar-guide.html (where I got ours)
http://www.americas-pet-store.com/details/prodid/273.html
http://www.properpet.com/vibrating_collar.htm
http://www.yourdogtrainer.com/products/collars.htm

She also recommended the link LifeisdaPits recommended

www.deafdogs.org

Happy reading. Hopefully we'll be able to compare stories. Since I'm definately getting Bully, I'm ordering "living with a deaf dog" by Susan Cope Becker & a pocket handbook on American Sign Language this morning.

I've read young dogs can know as many as 20 different hand signals, and adult dogs as many as 50.
 
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