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For the past week or so my dog has been limping (alternating between front and back legs). Obviously I took him to the vet when it started....and also today as he cried almost with every step. The x-rays showed what looked like to be the onset of Pano....so he's on 3 different medications, eating less, and also eating a diet lower in protein. I know he was growing quickly for the first couple of weeks, but it has slowed down a good amount (currently 37 lbs @ 16 weeks). Anyway from what I read, 4 months is pretty young to be experiencing these TERRIBLE growing pains. Does anyone have any advice or suggestions to help him through this, he is so said and stressed out??? Thanks!
 

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I wish I knew what to tell you but all I can say is I am sorry :cry:
 

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Found some info on Pano, It refers to a basset hound (I found it on my basset site) but Pano is Pano is Pano :wink:

Paneosteitis Sometimes referred to as "growing pains" or "pano", occurs as a rotating lameness, usually in puppies up to 18 months. Many veterinarians are not aware that this is prevalent in basset hounds and will sometimes misdiagnose it, often with costly and unneeded surgery options. Pano IS prevalent in basset hounds as we've seen many, many of our members' hounds diagnosed with this over the years.

The following is from the Basset Hound Faq by Judy Trenck:

Paneosteitis is an elusive ailment occasionally seen in young Bassets. It is also known as wandering or transient lameness. Attacks are usually brought on by stress and aggravated by activity, and up to now, the cause and the cure are unknown. This mysterious
disease causes sudden lameness, but its greatest potential danger
may lie in false diagnosis, resulting in unnecessary surgery. A
puppy will typically outgrow it by the age of two with no long term
problems. It can be quite minor, or so bad that the dog will not
put any weight on the leg. Symptoms may be confused with "elbow
displasia", "hip displasia", "patellar luxation" and other more
serious disorders. The most definite way to diagnose paneosteitis
is radiographically. Even with this, signs can be quite minimal and
easily missed. As to treatment, no cure was found in experimental
tests and the only helpful thing found was relief for pain (aspirin,
cortisone, etc.) However, using these, the dog tends to exercise
more and thereby aggravate the condition. Note again: A GREAT MANY VETS ARE UNAWARE OF THIS DISEASE IN THE BASSET .
In diagnosing the cause of a Basset's lameness, a radiograph of the
forelimbs may indicate a condition called elbow incongruity. (Elbow
incongruity is a poor fit between the 3 bones which comprise the
elbow joint.) Studies to date indicate that elbow incongruity is
normal in the Basset and is not the cause of the lameness. It is
also suspected that many of the previously mentioned unnecessary
(panosteitis) surgeries have been performed on Basset Pups just
because radiographs that were taken showed elbow incongruity. A
study on forelimb lameness in the Basset is currently underway at the
School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. As
previously mentioned they have determined that elbow incongruity
occurs in the Basset but suspect that incongruity rarely causes the
lameness. During the course of the study, conservative therapy will
be recommended for all cases in which panosteitis appears to be the
cause of the lameness. In cases with severe growth deformities or
elbow pain associated with elbow incongruity, surgery may be
recommended. If your Basset develops lameness and is diagnosed with an "elbow problem", discuss with your veterinarian the possibility
of panosteitis.
http://www.dailydrool.com/pano.html


Poor baby. I hope he is feeling better soon
 

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I've heard that massaging their legs can help with the lameness. Plus it stimulates blood flow and just feels good. Try to keep his activity level low so his Pano is not aggrivated.

Most importantly, tell him that you love him and that things will get better.
 
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