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We just switched Dozer's food to Wellness and we started giving him a bigger bowl and now he doesn't want to eat right. How can I tell if he doesn't like the food? I tried what everyone suggested by taking the food away but he is still not eating what he should for his age (5 months). He is not losing weight though so I don't think he is sick

Also we have forced hot air in the house and it is causing him to have a lot of phlegm. Any ideas how to break it up We have been using lemon juice as the breeder suggested but it is not doing much help. I think this may be causing him not to want to eat.

Thanks for anyones input :D
 

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Your dog has worms, the phlegm is caused by the worms mirgration from the lungs to the stomach. It will also cause the dog to lose his appetite.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Once in a while. I posted another question. He is more congested than anything else. We solved the eating issue. It was the food.
 

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I read your message about phlegm. We adopted a 1-1/2 year old english bulldog 2 weeks ago. He seemed to get very congested, just a couple of days ago. You mentioned something about it being caused by his food. Can you explain? We are currently feeding him IAMS.

We also have forced hot air heat. Could that be causing this problem?
 

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pitmommy said:
Your dog has worms, the phlegm is caused by the worms mirgration from the lungs to the stomach. It will also cause the dog to lose his appetite.
Not trying to start anything, but how do you figure that? Without having a fecal done at the vets (& even then tapeworm eggs rarely show up then but are seen by the naked eye when segments are passed in a bm), there is no way to "diagnose" that. There are several reasons why the dog is coughing up phlegm & all should be discussed with the owner by his/her vet.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The food issue had nothing to do with the phlegm. He didn't like the food that's why Dozer wasn't eating so we put him on Natures Balance.

We took Dozer to the vet about the phlegm and the vet said a lot of things can be contributing to it. First he had a virus so we had to get that cleared up. Once he felt better the phlegm wasn't as bad. The vet said to keep his crate away from the heating vent and to sleep with a humidifer. Both of which we are doing and our little guy is doing a lot better.
 

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dltdance said:
The food issue had nothing to do with the phlegm. He didn't like the food that's why Dozer wasn't eating so we put him on Natures Balance.

We took Dozer to the vet about the phlegm and the vet said a lot of things can be contributing to it. First he had a virus so we had to get that cleared up. Once he felt better the phlegm wasn't as bad. The vet said to keep his crate away from the heating vent and to sleep with a humidifer. Both of which we are doing and our little guy is doing a lot better.
:D
 

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Miakoda said:
pitmommy said:
Your dog has worms, the phlegm is caused by the worms mirgration from the lungs to the stomach. It will also cause the dog to lose his appetite.
Not trying to start anything, but how do you figure that? Without having a fecal done at the vets (& even then tapeworm eggs rarely show up then but are seen by the naked eye when segments are passed in a bm), there is no way to "diagnose" that. There are several reasons why the dog is coughing up phlegm & all should be discussed with the owner by his/her vet.
I Read, I dont just listen to the vet, I inform myself so I know how to discuss issues with my vet. Round Worms are one cause of phlegm and I will say probably 85% of the time, . You are mistaken if you think your dog is worm free by a vets diagnoses.Many worm species cannot be detected by the exam done at the vet. For instance Gigardia requires a special test that is almost never suggested because you sometimes cannot detect Gigardia in one fecal exam. IT must be done in a period of ten days with three different samples. And my post was a suggestion, getting the owner to think about another possibility. Usually when a dog is coughing up phlem it is the round worm migration.(And probably is missed in the fectal exam )The ingested eggs and they migrate to the lungs by blood vessels, and bouring thru tissue., during which time they mature. They then mirgrate to the stomach thru mucus to the mouth into the esophagus, where they reach the adult stage.Treatment of this worm is readily wrong, since the mistake is that the eggs in the ground do not die and the dog becomes reinfested quickly after treatment, ( treatments must be repeated in two weeks.) As far as Tape worm samples vets and people often mistake vegtable particicles for tapeworm segments, vice versa,
 

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First, Giardia isn't a "worm".

Second, I was just making the comment that based on what a poster said, you diagnosed her dog immediately with worms. Not only is that incorrect, but giving out medical advice which someone might take seriously & follow, can harm their dog & then guess whose the bright one responsible........

Yes, I know round worms are often vomited up. I'm a cert. vet. tech. so I understand a lot of these things. But I also understand that a dog with phlegm might have something other thatn "worms" going on so it's best to suggest a visit to the vet.

Just b/c you read articles on the internet doesn't make you a doctor. It's good you do "research" but remember that most of the articles you find are either written by a) biased vets pertaining to a certain subject under discussion or b) just the average Joe Schmoe who felt like putting something out there without having a medical degree.

As far as Tape worm samples vets and people often mistake vegtable particicles for tapeworm segments
I'd LOVE to see your proof of vets do this. I'm not sure what kind of vet you go to, but when a dog passes a moving, wiggly tapeworm segment (last time I checked, veggies don't squirm around as if "alive"), not only is it a visual assessment, but then we take it to the microscope, prepare as slide & evaluate it there. And it's quite obvious to see the tapeworm eggs contained in the segment.

Again, know your facts before you "publish".
 

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Miakoda said:
First, Giardia isn't a "worm".

Second, I was just making the comment that based on what a poster said, you diagnosed her dog immediately with worms. Not only is that incorrect, but giving out medical advice which someone might take seriously & follow, can harm their dog & then guess whose the bright one responsible........

Yes, I know round worms are often vomited up. I'm a cert. vet. tech. so I understand a lot of these things. But I also understand that a dog with phlegm might have something other thatn "worms" going on so it's best to suggest a visit to the vet.

Just b/c you read articles on the internet doesn't make you a doctor. It's good you do "research" but remember that most of the articles you find are either written by a) biased vets pertaining to a certain subject under discussion or b) just the average Joe Schmoe who felt like putting something out there without having a medical degree.

As far as Tape worm samples vets and people often mistake vegtable particicles for tapeworm segments
I'd LOVE to see your proof of vets do this. I'm not sure what kind of vet you go to, but when a dog passes a moving, wiggly tapeworm segment (last time I checked, veggies don't squirm around as if "alive"), not only is it a visual assessment, but then we take it to the microscope, prepare as slide & evaluate it there. And it's quite obvious to see the tapeworm eggs contained in the segment.

Again, know your facts before you "publish".

OK yes I know gigardia is not a worm, I using the misdiagnoses to make a point. And I said People and Vets both can mistake veg tissue and tapeworm seg, and you forgot to quote Vice Versa/ I am aware vegtables dont move thanks for the info. Because the eggs are passed by the pet in packets (segments), they often do not show up on the fecal exam. (The packet must break open for the eggs to be seen.) Consider that the pet has tapeworms if segments are seen under its tail, around its anus, or on its feces. Segments can be passed in small groups connected to each other leading the owner to describe a worm that sounds larger than a grain of rice. Tapeworm segments are also quite flat.

Very few of my sources come from the internet FYI. \ Anyway my post was to make the person aware . And guess who the bright one responsible is, someone following anyones advice on the Internet like you said. I still stand by my post. I do on the other hand apologize for not rephrasing the quote. And its highly unlikely that anyharm will come from worming the dog. And I am sure they though about when the dog was wormed and if it was recently disregarded my info. Again MY facts are my facts , and your studies could be completely different than mine. ON the otherhand are you telling me that as you take samples you examine them that you never , never make a mistake, this is highly unlikely. The fact that your a vet tech does not make you anymore an expert than me.
 

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pitmommy said:
Your dog has worms, the phlegm is caused by the worms mirgration from the lungs to the stomach. It will also cause the dog to lose his appetite.
This was not a suggetion to the o.p. You DIAGNOSED his dog & over the internet no less. Congratulations, you should be a doctor.
 

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Whats up, I said I wish I had rephrased the quote ,It was ment to be a Suggestion. So would you like to go round and round or drop it?
 
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