Bulldog Breeds Forums banner

At what point would you consider having a fearful pup PTS?

  • The moment you first realize the puppy is fearful or has weak nerves.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • After several months of training and you've noticed no improvement in confidence.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I'd wait until the pup showed signs of aggression toward me or my children.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Never. I'd work with the puppy as long as it takes.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I wouldn't, but I'd re-home the pup to a home without children.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • None of the above. (Please explain your answer in your post.)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not starting this thread to begin controversy! I'm just curious and would like to hear your thoughts. If you could, please give me your fact-based opinion, and let's not attack anyone else's view or start arguments. Let's be open to what everyone has to say.

(The poll isn't showing up on my "preview" -- I hope this works!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,789 Posts
I voted "Never. I'd work with the puppy as long as it takes."

To me having spent so many years at the rescue and working with dogs who were abused, and left for dead and see them do a complete 180 and end up being happy loving companions for someone makes me believe that every dog should be worked with as long as it takes to see some sort of improvement.

We have had dogs who would fall on the floor and starting "screaming" bloody murder if anyone tried to pet them or moved to fast. We worked with those dogs for months even years, because there was always some hope left. Every dog deserves a chance and you have to be willing to work with them without wanting to throw out "put them to sleep" because honestly, you're losing some great companions because someone just didn't want to take the dog to work with them.

Now if we have dogs who are biting people, or going after us...we still put them in training usually NILIF (nothing in life is free) and basically work the heck out of them. But when everything comes down and we see no real improvement and we think that dog could seriously hurt someone we do what we have to do and if that's putting them to sleep, we make sure they pass on in our arms because we love them.

that's my take on everything, some may not agree with it but we do what we feel is best for that dog, us and the people around us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
LifeIsDaPits said:
Now if we have dogs who are biting people, or going after us...we still put them in training usually NILIF (nothing in life is free) and basically work the heck out of them. But when everything comes down and we see no real improvement and we think that dog could seriously hurt someone we do what we have to do and if that's putting them to sleep, we make sure they pass on in our arms because we love them.
I agree with this. I would do everything in my power to help train an aggressive dog, but if results can not be achieved then I would put the dog to sleep. Quite honestly I think it is not only better for any human that has contact with the dog, but for the dog as well.

I think that there is a difference between a dog that has been badly abused (but still capable of being trained) and a dog exhibiting a genetic anomaly causing it to have an unstable temperament. In my world, there wouldn't be a place for dogs with these genetic faults. Depending on the situation, I still think that efforts to manage the problem should be the primary course of action, but if the behavior can not be controlled (within a reasonable amount of time), then the dog needs to be humanely put to sleep. There are too many loving, well behaved dogs in homeless shelters needing good homes to justify the time, money, and energy needed in attempting to control severe behavioral issues in individual aggressive dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,789 Posts
I agree. We usually have what we call "trial" periods. We put that dog(s) in training and after 6 months and we have seem some improvement we allow them to be placed in foster homes, and they continue to be trained and worked with in and out of the home. Sadly, we do lose alot of dogs because some just don't show any improvement, but I think it's only a "lost cause" when you don't try.

We do have dogs that don't even make it to training, sometimes the issues are just so deep that the only thing we can do is to put them down and try to save another. Alot of dogs we have are BYB pups and the problems owners have with them get so bad, and that's how they come to us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
I am no expert on dogs, or weak nerves, or any thing of the sort. But my boxer, is scared of most loud noises, the vacuum, freaks out over a lawn mower or blower or weed eater, if there is a sudden movement around him, he will crouch down and look up as if he is pleading for you not to hit him. On the fourth of July, jumped through a window trying to get back in the house when a firework went off. So I am sure some would say he has weak nerves. He was a rescue, we got him when he was about 6 months old according to the vet. He had been abused, and completely emaciated, he was found wondering the streets. But with all of that said, he is he best dog I have ever had!!!!! The only time he has ever shown the least amount of aggression, is if someone tries to hurt me or my kids. Esp the kids. If he is around and I spank one of them, he will grab my arm with his mouth. Not hard at all, but he lets me know to stop!!!! He is 3 now and has not had the first issue, like I said he is the best dog I have ever owned. Everyone who has ever met him, loves him. He is so sweet and gentle. Loves my kids to death. No matter what they do to him!!!!!

It is a joke in my house now, my oldest son will tell me to spank him, just so Beaux will get me!!!! I have it on video, I will see if I can figure out how to get it on the computer. It is very amusing!!!! I use to pop them with a wooden spoon, and left it on a chair, guess Beaux though he was going to show me, the ate it, chomped it in to a million pieces. Did I mention he was very smart too!!!!

But that is just my two cents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,660 Posts
I voted that I would put the dog down after several months of working with a professional with no signs of improvment. If working a dog for several months can not increase or create a bond then I believe that it is probably a lost cause. A dog that is not showing any sign of improvment after you have proven yourself a worthy owner I would be seriously concerned about and with agreement of a pro probably put down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
All great thoughts. Really makes you think.

See, I know that Nala is very timid. She sometimes runs from people or shys away (yet she always peeks aruond the corner and comes back)...other times she runs right up to people and gives kisses. Just depends on what she feels from that person, I guess.

She is very, very gentle and passive. Yet she will play with full vigor with Koa, and she seems very confident and playful around the dogs. You don't want to mess with this girl in tug-of-war, she's ruthless! :lol: She absolutely LOVES children. She wants to be with my son ALL THE TIME, loves to snuggle with him.

She is only 3 mos old, and has a problem with submissive urination, which I'm waiting to see if she outgrows. (She just piddles a little when I first come home and she's so excited to see me or excited to see Heaven & Koa....never any other time.) I don't know if there is a difference between a fearful pup.. a pup who is not confident.. a pup who has been neglected or abused.. a submissive pup.. or a pup with genetic weak nerves. How do you tell? And which ones do you think can be undone?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,983 Posts
Bogart said:
LifeIsDaPits said:
Now if we have dogs who are biting people, or going after us...we still put them in training usually NILIF (nothing in life is free) and basically work the heck out of them. But when everything comes down and we see no real improvement and we think that dog could seriously hurt someone we do what we have to do and if that's putting them to sleep, we make sure they pass on in our arms because we love them.
I agree with this. I would do everything in my power to help train an aggressive dog, but if results can not be achieved then I would put the dog to sleep. Quite honestly I think it is not only better for any human that has contact with the dog, but for the dog as well.

I think that there is a difference between a dog that has been badly abused (but still capable of being trained) and a dog exhibiting a genetic anomaly causing it to have an unstable temperament. In my world, there wouldn't be a place for dogs with these genetic faults. Depending on the situation, I still think that efforts to manage the problem should be the primary course of action, but if the behavior can not be controlled (within a reasonable amount of time), then the dog needs to be humanely put to sleep. There are too many loving, well behaved dogs in homeless shelters needing good homes to justify the time, money, and energy needed in attempting to control severe behavioral issues in individual aggressive dogs.

Both Bogart and James explain it perfectly for me and my feelings.


Trina - I have a dog named Holly and she is a Springer Spaniel. I got her as a pup from a kill shelter here. They did not want me to get her because they said she was timid and snippy but there was something about her that told me to take her. She is 12 years old now and has never bitten anyone. She has been a timid dog - hides when new people or men with hats comes into the house. I decided early on this was a trauma thing from her puppy days and it was so bad she never forgot. I have allowed her the right to stay behind and not push her and I tell my guests not to push her as well. After awhile when she realizes that all is safe she comes out and then she is all over people eanting to be petted. I have just respected this issue with her because at no time has she ever showed any aggression because of it. She has been a good family dog and I have never regretted my decision to take her home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Sad to think that if Nala fell into the hands of someone else, she'd probably be dead by now..

I don't think it's that she has weak nerves. I think she was just neglected and abused, and is learning how to trust. She's still a baby, I am going to give her a fair chance!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top