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I received this in a packet from my vet when we first took Haus in. I thought I'd share it since these are commonly asked questions:

Crate Training
This is NOT a 'cage' to your puppy, it is an artificial den. You have seen dogs behind chairs or under tables. They are looking for a special safe place or a 'den.' That is what a crate will represent to your puppy.

There are many advantages to having your puppy crate trained. It is usually easy to housebreak puppies when using a crate. They do not like to soil the area where they have to lay. Therefore, they learn to hold urine or feces until they are outside their special area. If they puppy does soil the crate, it usually means the crate is too large and needs to be reduced in size. By 8-10 weeks of age, crated puppies will usually refrain from soiling the crate for 8 hours. Another advantage to crate training is that your puppy will be in a safe place when you are not home. In a crate, your puppy cannot chew clothes , furniture, shoes, electrical wires or anything else. When you travel with your pet, or must leave your pet with friends, your puppy will have his or her own familiar place, regardless of new surroundings. Once your pet is completely housebroken, which means not eliminating in the house, chewing or getting into things, leave the crate door open and the puppy will often voluntarily go into the crate to sleep or be alone.

Purchase a crate to fit the adult size of your pet. It can be blocked off as your puppy grows simply by inserting boards or slates through the crate. Wire crates are best because the puppy can see everything that is going on. The crate should be in a high traffic area such as the kitchen. It should not be placed in the garage or basement except at night when the puppy must quickly learn that lights out means no further playtime for today. Nothing should be in the crate with your puppy except a Nylabone, which can be chewed without pieces breaking off. Rawhide bones should only be chewed under supervision. It is not necessary to keep food or water in your puppy's crate.

When introducing your puppy to the crate for the first time, make it a happy exercise. Since puppies love to eat, give your puppy a treat for getting in the crate. When he or she is being quiet, give gentle, soft praise. Teach your puppy that quiet will bring praise and attention for you, whining and fussing will not. Puppies are extremely impressionable. How you manage your puppy will have a dramatic and long lasting effect. You can make you puppy a better pet and prevent behavior problems by taking a few precautionary steps.

Housebreaking
Establish a routine. Regularly schedule meals to encourage predictable elimination patterns. Take your puppy outside every 1-2 hours during the day and take him or her to only one toilet area. Take the puppy to the toilet area after feeding, awakening, playing or excitement also when you see the puppy circling or sniffing around. After the puppy eliminates in the appropriate area, reward him or her with treats and praise. If you do catch your puppy eliminating in the house, distract him or her by shouting 'no' or clapping your hands. Quickly take the puppy outside to the toilet area and reinforce using this area. Do not push your pet's nose into the soiled area or strike the puppy. Not only is this ineffective, it may encourage aggression and fear-related problems.

Socialization
Dogs, like wolves, are pack animals. Therefore, dogs relate to people as pack members. It is up to owners to become the leader of the pack by performing simple exercises and stopping aggressive play. Introduce your puppy to new experiences, places and people regularly. Brush the puppy daily, and handle his or her feet, ears and mouth. Gradually expose your puppy to loud noises such as the vacuum cleaner.

Prevent bad habits
Provide appropriate chew toys and give praise for chewing these objects. Rotate toys to prevent boredom and gently punish inappropriate chewing. Keep your puppy crated when unsupervised. Do not allow aggressive behavior such as tug of war, jumping, growling, nipping or food guarding. Make definate rules about dog manners and be prepared to enforce the word 'no.'

Nothing is free
The 'nothing is free' technique helps to establish leadership. Your puppy must obey a command before getting something he or she likes. No food rewards are used. The reward is what the dog wants in the particular situation, be it love, praise, pats or going outside. The only way your puppy should get what he or she wants is by behaving.

Training
Additional training can be started at 8-10 weeks.

Teenage pups-QUESTION(debs):
Teenage Pup - What can I do?
Moose is a GREAT pup and he walks on the leash well. We have a pinch collar for him so he doesn't pull too much. Now my problem is when I walk him and another dog starts barking at him he fixates on that dog and gets very aggressive thru the fence with the other dog. Now this is what I do:

1. I walk him by the fence on the sidewalk and firmly tell him �be nice�.
(he knows this means to be good)
2. If he starts to fight thru the fence I yank him with the command NO and make him sit.
3. I make him sit next to the fence until he relaxes and then proceed to walk. If he starts
up again I do everything all over again.
Now I try to get his attention off the other dog but it takes a while. Is there something I am doing wrong or something else I can do? I won't leave the area until he totally listens to me. Please advise.


ANSWER(Carrie):

Ahh yes...male AB's in their teenage years.... I swear you can have the most obedient, sweet, male pup who's done so well with his training...then the hormones kick in and...BAM...NO BRAIN!! They start to challenge your authority and act as if they have never been taught a thing in their life..frustrating, I know! I always go right back to square one with obedience work. It sounds like you have the right idea as far as having him sit by the fence with the other dog behind it....make him do some obedience moves and keep him focused on you as much as you can, if you are keeping him busy, he should be focusing on you more and thinking of the other dog less. Give lots of happy praise when he does his OB and ignores the distraction. Your dog should realize that what you have (praise, treats, etc.) is much more important than the other dog. Make sure too though, that you aren't anticipating the other dog, because your dog will pick up on your anxiety and the problem will keep happening. Hopefully I have made some sense, if not, just say so, and I will clarify!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Awww thanks Jackie!! :love10:

I actually split the thread so that if anyone replied, I'd notice is sooner.
 

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HausMommy said:
Socialization
Dogs, like wolves, are pack animals. Therefore, dogs relate to people as pack members. It is up to owners to become the leader of the pack by performing simple exercises and stopping aggressive play. Introduce your puppy to new experiences, places and people regularly. Brush the puppy daily, and handle his or her feet, ears and mouth. Gradually expose your puppy to loud noises such as the vacuum cleaner.

MY DOG IS PETRIFIED OF THE VACUUM, BLOW DRYER, HAIR IRON, AND PERFUME OR ANY TYPE OF SPRAY BOTTLE. WHEN SHE SEES OR HEARS ANY OF THEM SHE GOES NUTS RUNNNING AROUND IN CIRCLES BARKING CRYING JUMPING ON THE BED RUNNING AND HIDING UNDERNEATH. ITS FUNNY, BUT ITS PART OF MY EVERY DAY LIFE AND I FEEL BAD.
 

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We are definatlyhaving a problem with our bully puppy nipping and biting, she even lunges sometimes. What can we do, i am worried about her becoming too aggressive and biting when she gets bigger. She is 8 weeks old.
Thank you
 

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The crate traing tips are excellent. I have always used crates, and had great success. Zorro is 15 months now, and he voluntarily goes in his crate to rest. Also, he is definitely in his teenage years :lol:
 

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cdc said:

I have a question for you. If I am sitting down or sometimes even laying in bed, Zorro will sit down next to me and put his paw on me. It's kinda cute, but not at 6am lol. Is this just him wanting attention?
Depends on your dog drive I guess. If Roxy was to do it, I would say she was dominating me, Marley would be wanting attention, she's more of a pack dog, If Charlie did it, I'd freak, it'd mean he'd eating threw the stairs and escaped!! :shock: lol

I think you get to know your dog and it's requirements by the age of two.
 

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I would say from the article you had posted on another thread, that Zorro is definitely more of a pack dog. He loves being petted, playing, being bathed, and spending time with people. When he does put his paw on me he has that begging look like he wants something :)
 

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the info on the crate

This is so true.. When we first got our Echo she would crawl under the coffee table, and any cubby spot.
When we were gone she ate everything like a chainsaw... We got the crate and BINGO we have a wonderful Girl.
I use to think this is mean to crate but was so wrong. Thanks for all this info.
Training and all the other thing's.
One more thing.. I've heard that American Bulldog's most normal dog training thing's will not work
because they need speical training? Do you know anything about this?
 

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This thread is clearly old but I am so glad I found it. At a few days short of six months it appears Hudson has reached his teens... Quick developer apparently! Other than his obvious physically trait it's like he woke up Saturday morning and decided he wants to make the decisions and be the center of attention combined with an endless supply of energy!

Thanks BDB for posting such usefull info to help us out and raise our dogs right!
 

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Well this link has just made me depressed (not really). I hoped that we were out of teen stage now that Delta is 14 mo...but I'm sorely mistaken...woo-hoo...only 10 more months to go :)
Tina: I'm glad you found this cause it was interesting reading for me too...
 

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I hope Hudson doesn't act like a teen for the next year and a half! Haha it's still early so it comes and goes. It's like he has on and off days.

There was a link listed on the first page I think that doesn't work. I really wanted to read it so will try to see if I can find the info.
 
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