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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems that my dog's symptoms point towards a wobblers type of situation, although he hasn't been formally diagnosed yet (further investigation will reveal the reality here).
...looks like the "puppy clumsiness" that he hasn't outgrown is really signs of neurological stress at some level.
Regardless of the outcome of the tests, I'm extremely curious about preserving the health of his nervous system.
Has anyone here had experience with this sort of thing?
Any ideas about preserving/improving the integrity of a dog's spinal cord and nervous system?
 

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relax

You sound like my wife, over diagnosing. Give that doggy a little more time. TLC, fresh, cool water, and some good dog food. Don't forget the walks and some yummy treats! One more thing, a nice clean, quiet place to sleep.



Wha's a matter wi you? I have a puppy too. They're all knuckleheads!


jackie, I'm a knucklehead toooooooooo
 

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How old is your pup? They are goofy messes for a while but if you feel that is seizing get that pup to the Vet...........There really isn't anything that you can do to preserve there spine and nervous sytem, that is all genetics since the pup is here it is offically out of your hands. The best that you can do is to clear of trama.
 

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After reading your post , I did an internet check and found this site. You may have already seen it, but in the article was this section on immediate care. Your dog needs to go to the vet asap and the determination on what course to take needs to be decided now with your vet. The longer you wait, the more permanent damage that can be caused.

web site:

http://personal.palouse.net/valeska/wobblers.htm

Immediate Care:

Dogs with slowly progressive signs of Wobblers Syndrome often respond well to a combination of cage rest and corticosteroid therapy. I usually apply a neck brace as well to provide some stabilization of the neck and at the same time some traction as well. This is only if the syndrome is caught in the early stages. Remember that the above will only alleviate the effects of compression of the cord and does not and will not correct the vertebral
and ligamentous changes. The IMMEDIATE thing to do is to reduce the protein level of the diet. A protein level not to exceed 22-24% should be fed. Any and all mineral supplements should be discontinued. All food and water must be elevated to further reduce neck tension. Ball playing or any action where the head is dipped down to snatch up an object is to be eliminated. A very concerted effort to restrain this dog from exercise is to be instituted as this can easily yield an increase in the likelihood of vertebral subluxation or further damage to the spinal cord. It is a known fact that signs of joint instabilities are less severe in animals kept in a sedentary environment than those allowed unrestricted exercise. Hopefully if this is discovered early and the diet is changed while the bones are still forming and little recurrence of cord trauma occurs, the remaining formation of bone will be normal and the condition can stabilize itself to the point that surgery will not be needed. Surgery for the slowly progressive form of cervical spondylopathy may not be as rewarding as with the acute form, if it is discovered late since the damage to the spinal cord may be permanent. It may however, prevent further damage to the cord.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Jackie

Jackie -
Overdiagnosis: over•di•ag•no•sis
Pronunciation: -"dI-ig-'nO-s&s, -&g-
Function: noun : the diagnosis of a condition or disease more often than it is actually present

In the future I suggest two things:
1. Do not use words you don't understand. Perhaps you meant misdiagnosed, or inappropriately diagnosed... I have not and my vets have not "overdiagnosed" this dog. If you go back and read you will note that NO FORMAL DIAGNOSIS HAS BEEN MADE... How can one overdo something that doesn't exist?

2. Actually READ what is written before responding. I did not ask if someone would please console me, or critique my thought process - I asked if anyone had information on a very specific situation, and if there was info regarding the preservation of the nervous system. This not a situation that TLC, treats, and your poor advice will help. I was asking for REAL help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Angie7349

Angie7349-

My dog is 15 monthsold, and if he DOES continue to grow (including his neck bones) it is VERY possible that his spinal cord impingement may go away...
I do not believe that he is full grown so there is hope there at a structural level, but by the time (and if) his spinal bones get larger and no longer press on the spinal cord, its still possible that any damage to the cord created NOW could remain even after the impingement is gone... that's the sort of stuff I was asking about... if anyone knew how to preserve the health of the cord to reduce the chances of long term symptoms.
It's kind of funny that you said clearing trauma was all we can do... The trauma to the cord is what we have the least control over...
i realize the structural components are a genetic thing; but nutrition, exercise specificity (including inactivity), naturo and homeopathic modalities are all factors that can influence outcome... those were the types of things I was asking for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Gazar

Gazar,

Thank you!
This was the type of help/info I was asking for.
We have visited a few vets - with various areas of specialty - this began in April.
We were asked to wait - although he was demonstrating neurological symptoms of some type, the original plan was to come back for reassessment after a period of time to make sure it wasn't merely a clumsy dog. We would only come back sooner if his symtoms appeared worse.
One reason that some vets had not considered wobblers a great possibility initially was because it usually affects danes and dobermans, not bulldogs - so they thought it was less likely.
Now with time that passed, and symptoms that remain - this is more than just puppy clumsiness, so we take the next step towards investigation at a deeper level.

His x-rays are tomorrow and that will answer a few questions, but my thought is still the same:
Regardless of outcome (wobblers/something else/nothing at all), I'm still interested in the improvement of his nervous system and structural health.
 

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Re: Gazar

CGraney said:
Gazar,

Thank you!
This was the type of help/info I was asking for.
We have visited a few vets - with various areas of specialty - this began in April.
We were asked to wait - although he was demonstrating neurological symptoms of some type, the original plan was to come back for reassessment after a period of time to make sure it wasn't merely a clumsy dog. We would only come back sooner if his symtoms appeared worse.
One reason that some vets had not considered wobblers a great possibility initially was because it usually affects danes and dobermans, not bulldogs - so they thought it was less likely.
Now with time that passed, and symptoms that remain - this is more than just puppy clumsiness, so we take the next step towards investigation at a deeper level.

His x-rays are tomorrow and that will answer a few questions, but my thought is still the same:
Regardless of outcome (wobblers/something else/nothing at all), I'm still interested in the improvement of his nervous system and structural health.

Your welcome - Hope all goes well at the vets - have my fingers crossed. Don't be too upset with "our Jackie", he has an "Everglades" sense of humor and really is a sweet person.
:D
 

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Jackie said:
hmmm. grrr.
:lol: :lol:

It seems that my dog's symptoms point towards a wobblers type of situation, although he hasn't been formally diagnosed yet (further investigation will reveal the reality here).
...looks like the "puppy clumsiness" that he hasn't outgrown is really signs of neurological stress at some level.
Regardless of the outcome of the tests, I'm extremely curious about preserving the health of his nervous system.
Has anyone here had experience with this sort of thing?
Any ideas about preserving/improving the integrity of a dog's spinal cord and nervous system?
We are over the net if you do not post important details about your situation we can not help you. You said that your dog was a pup so it sounded like you were over reacting. You also said that he had not been formally diagnosed, so it sounded like you had diagnosed him.You would not believe all of the over reactive 1st time pup parents we see, so I did not take your post all that serious(doubt Jackie did either). If you want to be taken seriously then post important details like the "puppy" is over a year old and we have seen several Vets. :wink:

[-o< I hope that there is something that can be done and best wishes for you and your puppy-A
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Oh jeeze I think I made a mess here...

Jackie, I apologize for my comments if they offended you.
I can appreciate a wacky sense of humor (if thats what 'everglades' humor means), but I guess I missed the light feel of the message and only saw the criticism.
I would like to retract anything in that message that might have been rude/inappropriate.
Here let the men in black guys flash that thing and wipe out your memory of my message. :glasses4: :glasses5:

Angie, thank you. I will remember your advice for future postings and be sure to include info that lets people know that I'm not just crazy.

I realize this way of communicating can often be a source of confusion and misunderstanding.
I am responsible for what I write and say, but I sure can't take responsibility for your misinterpretation of it.
I never said my dog was still a pup - I said he never outgrew his puppy clumsiness.
If I said "I still have some baby fat", that doesn't mean I must be a baby.

Thank you for your concern.
 

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don't worry about it, I deserved it

my reply was kind of stupid. And now it's time for a song...

I'm a looooooser.
I'm a looooooser.
And I'm not what I appear to be...


deep in the glades,
jackie


P.S. but thanks to the girls for being pals, love ya!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Re: don't worry about it, I deserved it

Jackie said:
my reply was kind of stupid. And now it's time for a song...

I'm a looooooser.
I'm a looooooser.
And I'm not what I appear to be...


deep in the glades,
jackie


P.S. but thanks to the girls for being pals, love ya!!!
huh?
 

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Re: don't worry about it, I deserved it

CGraney said:
Jackie said:
my reply was kind of stupid. And now it's time for a song...

I'm a looooooser.
I'm a looooooser.
And I'm not what I appear to be...


deep in the glades,
jackie


P.S. but thanks to the girls for being pals, love ya!!!
huh?
We say that a lot too. This is Jackie's apology to you. :wink: :D
 

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CGraney said:
Oh jeeze I think I made a mess here...

Jackie, I apologize for my comments if they offended you.
I can appreciate a wacky sense of humor (if thats what 'everglades' humor means), but I guess I missed the light feel of the message and only saw the criticism.
I would like to retract anything in that message that might have been rude/inappropriate.
Here let the men in black guys flash that thing and wipe out your memory of my message. :glasses4: :glasses5:

Angie, thank you. I will remember your advice for future postings and be sure to include info that lets people know that I'm not just crazy.

I realize this way of communicating can often be a source of confusion and misunderstanding. .
That's an understatement :lol: if I had a dollar for everytime people misunderstood me or visa versa on here, well, you get what I am trying to say.
CGraney said:
I am responsible for what I write and say, but I sure can't take responsibility for your misinterpretation of it.
I never said my dog was still a pup - I said he never outgrew his puppy clumsiness.
If I said "I still have some baby fat", that doesn't mean I must be a baby.
Yes, I did confuse what you were saying and I am sorry. :oops: Anyways, best wishes to you and yours-A
 

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Okay, pretend like I just highlighted everyones quote....

LOL! This whole thread, as far as the OT comments, cracked me up!

CGraney, I really hope that whatever is wrong with your pup is diagnosed and treated. I don't have any suggestions or advice. I don't know anything about wobblers. Sorry. Best Wishes!!
 
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