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I know he is only 3 months and he doesn't bite too often with my husband and I but we have a 3 year old daughter and whenever she goes to see Tanner he either bites her clothes or her hands. He seems to be only playing but I would rather correct this behavior now as I don't want him to make it a habit. Any suggestions on how to make him stop? Thanks.
 

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Repitition is the key to this. Everytime he does that say NO. Teach your child to do it as well. Keep doing it over and over. I wouldn't suggest a smack on the nose or anything just because if your daughter sees it and does it, kids don't often know how hard they are hitting so she could hurt him without meaning to. Just keep telling him NO in a stern voice, and have your daughter do it and he'll get the hint. :)
 

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Faith was 6 months when we got her and she is now 9 months and she was doing that too. We also did the stern No and had our daughter do it also. She still does it once in awhile but not as much. We are also working on her not jumping on us and say Down firmly and she is getting the hint. Good luck! I'm sure he will catch on since they are such smart doggies! :D
 

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neimo said:
Repitition is the key to this. Everytime he does that say NO. Teach your child to do it as well. Keep doing it over and over. I wouldn't suggest a smack on the nose or anything just because if your daughter sees it and does it, kids don't often know how hard they are hitting so she could hurt him without meaning to. Just keep telling him NO in a stern voice, and have your daughter do it and he'll get the hint. :)
Neimo, this is off topic, but what kindof mastiff is Apollo? English Mastiff, or is he a Tosa? Either way great lookin dog! would like to see more pics of him.
 

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I apologize if this is stealing the post. My puppy is only 8 weeks old. When you hold her she will constantly try to bite your neck. Is this normal? What is the best way to cure this. I was trying the NO method and I think she may be too small. I have smacked her once for doing it but dont want this to cause more aggression. Thank you.

Damian
 

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Hi everyone and Merry Christmas

I am new to this board and about 10 days ago I bought an English Bulldog, 2 months old. He's a great softie and very clever but has the bad habit of playfully biting everyone that tries to pet him. I know that he is just having fun but I was advised by his vet that unless this stops, it can become very serious once he grows older. He has advised that he the word "NO" should be firmly used each time he does it and if persistent, some form of punishment should be instigated. Not hitting the dog as this will not bring any results but either restrict him or "sulk" at him and refuse to play or pay attention to him. I'll of course give this a try but if anyone has any other suggestions I would be most grateful
 

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This seems to be a common question among new puppy owners. Almost all puppies play bite. I found an article that may help:

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&cat=1547&articleid=163

Here is the text from it:

Q. How can I stop my puppy from nipping and biting?

A. A puppy likes biting and chewing on almost anything that enters her world. Just as with jumping, biting between littermates is their style of play. Biting also teaches them how to use their main hunting tool, their mouth with all those teeth. Unfortunately, this often carries over into their interactions with the members of their new home. All the people, including the children, are brought into the game. Puppies have very sharp teeth, and a bite or nip can hurt and be terrifying to small children. There are several methods that are used to eliminate this behavior.

Startle response and redirection
Patricia McConnell, Ph.D., an animal behaviorist and adjunct professor at the University of Wisconsin, suggests a method which startles the biting puppy. Just as the puppy bites down, make a sudden, abrupt, high-pitched and loud 'AWRP' sound. This would be the same sound that a littermate would make if bitten by the puppy. The sound should be so sudden and sharp that the puppy is immediately startled and stops the behavior. If done correctly, you will be surprised at how instantly the pup removes his mouth and looks bewildered. At that point, quickly substitute a toy, such as a ball, the puppy can chew on. This redirects the puppy's biting behavior to the ball. This way the puppy learns it is no fun at all biting you, but chewing on the toy is. You may need to do this multiple times if the puppy gets excited in play. If the 'AWRPs' make the puppy more excited, try another approach.

Stop the action
Dr. McConnell also suggests that, in some cases, just immediately (and dramatically) leave the room when the puppy bites. This is certainly a method children can use. After multiple times, the puppy will learn that every time she bites she loses her playmate, and that is no fun at all.

Important prevention measures!

No matter what method you use, do not entice the puppy to bite you. Games like tug-of-war and waving your hands in front of the puppy instead of using toys may encourage the puppy to bite.
 
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