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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking recently about how much I have learned over the past few years since getting involved in training and joining a couple different working dog clubs. When I look back 4 or 5 years ago to when I was basically just your average pet owner, I just can't believe it. I have learned so much! Still, have tons to learn, dont get me wrong, I just feel like I have come a very long ways thanks to some great people and some really passionate and patient trainers!

Anyways, for those who enjoy the working aspect of dogs.....what have you found to be the most important things you have learned since getting involved in whatever type of work you happen to do with your dogs? Feel free to list as many things as you like. I know with me the lessons I have learned have been many!

Look forward to reading some your replies and learning about your personal experiences! :)
 

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Many things.....

Two of the big things that I've learned is "things aren't always what they appear to be" and "more things are covered up then are proven".

As the saying goes.... "there is more than one way to skin a cat" and this holds true for training working dogs. Some methods are time consuming and the results can be unreliable, other methods give higher insurance of repeated behavior. One thing is true... the more tools you have in your bag, the better off you are! Often times I take a break from training.... I don't even think about it (hard to do... LOL). I'll go to a couple of seminars and reflect on how that style compares to the current style I'm using. Sometimes this is a good wake up as to problems in my own programs. No trainer is perfect all the time, otherwise he wouldn't be a good trainer!

Another point.... training from the decoy side of things is huge! More things are influenced or ruined by the decoy than I could have ever imagined. Decoys are not out there just taking bites... they are ensuring the proper development of that bite and the balance of drives to produce the desired outcome! Training directors are important, but they are seriously handicapped without a good decoy!

8)
 

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things i'v learned? lol , well , the first is that most people are full of crap, will tell you whatever they think they can get away with, and you will need a really big shovel to sift thru the chaff.
the second, there is no room for emotion in dog training.
and lastly,
when you are a dog things are black and white, and there can be no "shades of grey"
 

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attitude said:
when you are a dog things are black and white, and there can be no "shades of grey"
Ya, whithout a doubt..... if there are shades of gray they will definately show you all about it on the day of the trial!

8)
 

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watch and learn.

What is the most important thing I learned? There are some really talented people training dogs and if you want to learn from them, there has to be trust. People want to deal with people with character, honesty and integrity. As much as I say it is about the dogs, it is really about who you want to deal with and how consistent their actions are to their words.

The BEST trainers I have observed, awestruck, were very consistent in their training. I hope to emulate those techniques. I ask may questions and try to bring them up and visit with them.

And the more I know, I realize how little I know. I used to think, when I started out at a ring club, this particular Bravet dog was the most intense monster. LOL. Then I visited some dogs in California. LOL. Funny, the more you travel and actually see the dogs and their trainers, your world expands.

The most disappointing thing I learned? EGO. Lots of politics in dog training.

The most disappointing sight?
a ring III dog running away from a decoy scared. A sch III dog going into total avoidance from a shaking garbage bag.
 

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yep that is kinda important.

oh, here is a beauty.
ALWAYS wear a STRONG jock! Or you might loose a testicle like one dude I know. Yep, protect the boys.
 

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1- Thing i learned is there is more politics in dog training then an election, Ignore the arrrogant and learn from the best
2. I also learned that ALOT of trainers are jealous of eachother, dont listen to the jealousy and stare at the facts
3- Dogs that impressed me 2 years ago, dont anymore
4- Never learn from someone who is less accomplished then you. My mistake was going to a NEW sch club, big mistake. A good club, with a good TD and Decoy is Key!!! :p
 

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Could be a big list

When it comes to training dogs and gaining knowledge on the subject. Always keep your ears open and listen to what EVERYBODY has to say.Take what you like and disregard what you don't. Even a newbie can dawn light sometimes and pro's can misread. use your best better judgement and come up with your own plan and goals. Oh ya and read the Ivan Balibanov method :D
Elmer
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the replies everyone, I guess I will add my list now.... :D

Important lessons I have learned:

1. the best dogs in a trial often aren't the ones that are standing on the podium at the end of the day.

2. puppy imprinting is SOOOOO important, its easier to do things right from the get go then have to try and go back and fix problems later..

3. what you see in training tells you more about a dog than what you will see in trials....i.e. HOW was the dog trained? Was it babied? Was all the training done motivationally with no compulsion what so ever? Was the dog conditioned in order to handle the stresses of trials?

4. ANYONE can call themselves are a trainer....doesn't mean they are

5. Alot of weak dogs have sport titles

6. alot of dogs that look good in the beginning phases of training will often fold like an accordian when the pressure comes

7. no time for sugar coating out on the training field

8. more people SAY they want to join a club and work their dog than people that actually follow through when they find out the commitment involved

9. The majority of bull breeds lack what it takes to do PP/sport work well.

10. most dogs aren't breed worthy

11. What constitues a good GSD/mal (compliance) is not what constitutes a good bulldog. A handler SHOULD have to work harder with a bulldog to succeed in sport, than someone with a GSD/mal. IF its any good that is.
 
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