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I know this has been posted but way to many threads to go through to find it.Buster is 4 months now and I was wondering how often I can throw an egg into his food? When did you start seeing a difference in your dogs coat after feeding them eggs?
 

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I was just wondering about this same thing, and about to post a question on another site I visit. I've given mine raw eggs shell and all in their dog food a few times here and there. Maybe once a month if even that... Then this morning I was convincing a coworker that he must stop giving his dog onions and ran across this..


http://mooreshaven.com/pets/dogs/safety/badfoodslist.html

Raw egg whites contain a protein called avidin, which can deplete your dog of biotin, one of the B vitamins. Biotin is essential to your dog’s growth and coat health. Additionally, raw eggs are often contaminated with bacteria, such as salmonella, and you could end up giving your dog food poisoning in addition to biotin deficiency.

Symptoms of biotin depletion are hair loss, weakness, growth retardation and skeleton deformity. If your dog is suffering from these symptoms the situation is urgent, and veterinary treatment is needed. Cooked eggs are high in protein and make an excellent treat. It is only the raw eggs that should not be given to your dog.
I'll be cooking theirs a little for the future... I just would simply rather be safe than sorry.
 

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I always cook my dogs eggs lightly. One, bacause of what Jenn quoted, and two, because it just does not agree with Rosco. Raw eggs make backyard cleanup very disgusting at my house. Be careful about that. Some dogs just can't tolerate raw eggs.
 

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what about if you cook them fully? Is it not as good as raw? On the weekends when I make breakfast, I always scramble or fry an extra egg for D.
 

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All my dogs get a raw egg on their kibble most evenings. I don't do the shells because of potential contamination. They occaisonally get raw chicken necks too. As for food poisoning; my dogs eat s&*t on a regular basis - and by s&^t I don't mean inferior food, I mean feces. Not to mention any errant wildlife they might catch - it's not like I'll skin, debone and cook the squirrels and rabbits they bag. Carnivores have a short acidic gut that can tolerate most anything. I guess if my dogs were all kibble all the time, city living never ate goose s^&t kind of dogs I'd worry about giving them raw eggs, but as they are their tubes are well conditioned.

Paula
 

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This is some info about eggs and why they are best partially cooked. I just throw them in boiling water for about 5 mins. It cooks the white but not the yolk.

Avidin is in the egg white
Biotin is in the egg yolk.
There is more biotin than there is avidin.
Even if every molecule of avidin bound itself to a molecule of biotin there would still be more than enough biotin left over. Biotin is in many foods

From PetEducation.: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&cat=1662&articleid=712

"Biotin deficiencies have been reported following the ingestion of raw egg whites. Raw egg whites contain an enzyme called avidin that acts to destroy biotin. It is best if raw egg whites are not fed to dogs or cats. Cooking inactivates avidin. The yolk is very high in Biotin and if
the whole egg is fed, the avidin in the white and the high biotin in the yolk cancel each other out."

From the Linus Pauling institute:
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/biotin/

"Although biotin deficiency is very rare, the human requirement for dietary biotin has been demonstrated in two different situations: prolonged intravenous feeding without biotin supplementation and consumption of raw egg white for a prolonged period (many weeks to
years). Avidin is a protein found in egg white, which binds biotin and prevents its absorption. Cooking egg white denatures avidin, rendering it susceptible to digestion, and unable to prevent the absorption of dietary biotin (7)."

From Absolute Astronomy Encyclopaedia:

"Biotin deficiency rarely occurs in healthy individuals. This is due to the facts that the daily requirements of biotin are low [and] many foods contain adequate amounts, bacteria synthesize small amounts, and the body effectively scavenges and recycles biotin from bodily waste. However, deficiency can be caused by excessive consumption of raw egg-whites over a long period (months to years). Egg-whites contain high levels of avidin, a protein that binds
biotin strongly. Once cooked, the egg-white avidin becomes denatured and entirely non-toxic.

Sources of Biotin:
* Eggs
* Fish
* Milk and milk products
* Whole-grain cereals
* Legumes
* Yeast
* Broccoli and other vegetables in the cabbage family
* White and sweet potatoes
* Lean beef
 

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"The yolk is very high in Biotin and if
the whole egg is fed, the avidin in the white and the high biotin in the yolk cancel each other out." "


I was trying to say that (that the biotin deficiency isn't a problem if you feed the whole egg) but it kept coming out weird so I ultimately deleted it from my post. So thank you for posting it.

Paula
 

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Cooking the egg does not diminish its benefits. The only difference is less risk for food poisoning (which is pretty low). Dogs are omnivores, they eat weird stuff that they find all the time. Dogs are pretty resilient in that regard. That being said, you CAN drive with your feet, but that doesn't make it a good idea. I'd avoid the bones and raw meat even though it's probably safe. Why risk your dogs health? No bones and cooked meat won't make them less healthy. People love to point out that wolves eat bones and raw meat, but none of us have wolves (I hope). They get sick and die like crazy in the wild. They drop litters of puppies all the time to make up for it.
 

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BamBam's Dad said:
Cooking the egg does not diminish its benefits. The only difference is less risk for food poisoning (which is pretty low). Dogs are omnivores, they eat weird stuff that they find all the time. Dogs are pretty resilient in that regard. That being said, you CAN drive with your feet, but that doesn't make it a good idea. I'd avoid the bones and raw meat even though it's probably safe. Why risk your dogs health? No bones and cooked meat won't make them less healthy. People love to point out that wolves eat bones and raw meat, but none of us have wolves (I hope). They get sick and die like crazy in the wild. They drop litters of puppies all the time to make up for it.
The only raw they get is chicken necks. I know that BARF people regularly use raw chicken parts but I"m not too thrilled about gulpers and bolters like mine eathing raw thigh bones, etc. Neck bones are small and jointed. The one thing I noticed about feeding them raw was that they smelled different. Not that they smelled bad before, but there was no smell at all after raw. Shrug. RAW feeders - both for humans and canines - go on and on about the nutritional superiority of raw foods vs cooked where nutrients are lost in the process. You're right of course that they were not unhealthy on a superior kibble diet. With homecooked and raw I feel more confident about the quality of the food they eat. As for the whole 'wolves do it' I don't put much stock in that. What made me think about going homecooked was that at home in the boonies (the Caribbean) where people couldn't afford to feed kibble (thank goodness considering the kibble available) dogs were fed scalded offal (beef, chicken and fish), eggs and rice and such, and they thrived. I guess I wanted to see that.

Paula
 

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I wasn't trying to say that feeding raw was bad, I do it myself, so I hope it didn't come off that way. I just wanted to post the info I found about eggs. Certain foods arebetter fed cooked and some are better fed raw.
 

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Why eggs? for the coat?
Put 1/3- 1/2 table spoon of olive oil in every meal. The coat will shine like never before. Dont put to much, it will upset the stomach
 
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