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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have small concern with my dog. As the new owner of Roxy (20-month AB) over the weekend. She has bonded to me within a day (to my surprise), but maybe too much. Well, too much is never enough!

But I'd like too know if this behavior is ok for the moment. Roxy will simply follow me everywhere or be in the same room as long as she has me in line of sight. That is fine, but what I find a bit annoying is, as an example, I'm out with her in the backyard with her, I'll be taking out the garbage on the sidewalk and she start crying/barking to me the few secondes after where she can't see me. I'll come back and pet her telling her it's ok and that I'm here. But I wondered, if this behavior will eventually go away over time when she gets to better know our house routine / chores / activities?

I do find it annoying, but I also feel sad for her not being able to understand to I wasn't leaving her. I spoke to the previous owner over the weekend and he tolded me that she never did that to him. She definately barks/cry/whine when I leave to household, it stops not long after, but still. She has adopted the new environment (and my bed - which I have been able to correct already) pretty darn well so far. I'm just wishing her calling me out when I'm there, but not in sight goes away! Worst is that my wife and kids can be right next to her and she'll ignored them and try getting my attention...

BTW, we are also starting our obedience course this following Monday. I can't wait to work with her.

Cheers!
 

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sounds like seperation anxiety to me. try not to make such a big show over when you come back. ignore her for a few minutes and trhen when YOU are ready get her to sit and pet her calmly. You could also talk to your trainer when you go to class about it
 

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Definitely a case of separation anxiety. You need to stop reasurring her when you return to her. Try ignoring her more and only reward her when she's not fretting or paying attention to you. Under no circumstance should you return to her immediately after she whines for you and pet her and tell her OK..this only reinforces the behavior and makes things much worse. When you all leave the house, never say anything to her..just go. When you return, ignore her for at least 10 minutes or so. You never want to make a big deal out of you coming home.Try having your wife or kids take over some responsibilities for her, such as feeding, etc. That way she is not just bonding with you. You need to change things now..if she is having a problem like this already, it could compound given more time. Severe separation anxiety can be terrible..they can chew things or themselves to get to you in a panic. Her case is mild right now..work on it and you will see a big difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's what I thought. But from me? Why has the previous owner never seen this from her. I thought I was going to get separation anxiety symptoms for a little while when he left, but nothing. She acts as such just when I'm not near her vincinity. I was expecting a griefing period where she'd rather be left alone but I've gotten to complete opposite reaction to what I was expecting.

And I don't run back to her when she whines, I got about my yard chores and she stops. I can endure the barking/whining, but yikes, they can bark loud. I'm more concerned about the neighbors compalining about it! :(

Carrie, what I've done yesterday is have her watch me cook on the BBQ while she was inside the house looking out. She whined very little (as I asked my wife) and I didn't look at the door nor sat near it. My wife told she walked around paid a bit attention to kids and her but eventually just laid down on the titled floor waiting. Also, I've noticed what could be a little jealousy when I pick-up my 4-year old daughter. Roxy starts to get all playfull and overly excited which overhelms my daughter... Not sure what to do here... :?

My daughter caught head lice during the last week and while my wife and I tend to her head "needs" :) I put her in her crate where she could see all of us working (literally) on her head. She didn't fuss. We did the same yesterday, but this time I allowed Roxy near us and she laid down as if she understood it wasn't playtime. This is the behavior I'm looking for and received it.

Also, the previous owner (single household) allowed her to sleep in his bed. But that doesn't fly for my wife and I. My proudest moment thus far. I was able to get her to sleep next to me on the brand new super large pillow we bought for her without any treats, just positive reinforcement. She stayed to whole night until my wife gave her the ok to go in. Damnit! I now have a personnal wake-up call. Never thought that she could lick a face that fast!!! :shock:

Anyhow, I realize that there is work to do. But at least, Roxy is more then willing to please. I thought I was facing a tougher road as I wasn't the original owner. But I'm still dumbfounded as to why she connected with me so fast... Heck, I can't even get my dads dogs to respond like her and I've lived/known them for over 13 years.
 

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I have noticed with the bull breeds that they really tend to bond closely with one person in the household. I can tell anyone which dogs are "my" dogs, and which are my husbands. Typically, male dogs will bond better with women, and females will bond better with men. This isn't always the case and I do have close bonds with my females, but it does seem more common and the bond seems stronger than the average dogs.

I still second that your wife should take over the feeding and even traaining of the dog to help alleviate the anxiety. Also, don't let your wife cave and let the dog into bed. Until clear boundaries are known and positions are made, a new dog should not be allowed "human"priveledges..that includes being on the furniture, going out doors before the human does, etc.

As far as her jumping up after your daughter, it is not jealousy...I have seen that many times. Often times younger children are noisy and excitable. This can get these dogs very excited (like the squeal of a hog or something) Take that with the fact some dogs feel they are alpha over the kids, and when you pick them up, the dogs will jump up and nip at legs or bounce around in excitement. It's important to teach the dog that is not OK and to teach your children how to be around the dogs. I think it is important for the kids to do things to show alpha position (have the child make the dog sit or down, etc. for a treat, etc.) If Roxy jumps up after your daughter, give her a firm NO and make her sit or down (you may need help, such as your wife physically making Roxy do these things). You really will have to work with her on this. A good Obedience course or even a private trainer coming to teach the entire family how to work with Roxy would be a great thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Carrie said:
I have noticed with the bull breeds that they really tend to bond closely with one person in the household. I can tell anyone which dogs are "my" dogs, and which are my husbands. Typically, male dogs will bond better with women, and females will bond better with men. This isn't always the case and I do have close bonds with my females, but it does seem more common and the bond seems stronger than the average dogs.

I still second that your wife should take over the feeding and even traaining of the dog to help alleviate the anxiety. Also, don't let your wife cave and let the dog into bed. Until clear boundaries are known and positions are made, a new dog should not be allowed "human"priveledges..that includes being on the furniture, going out doors before the human does, etc.

As far as her jumping up after your daughter, it is not jealousy...I have seen that many times. Often times younger children are noisy and excitable. This can get these dogs very excited (like the squeal of a hog or something) Take that with the fact some dogs feel they are alpha over the kids, and when you pick them up, the dogs will jump up and nip at legs or bounce around in excitement. It's important to teach the dog that is not OK and to teach your children how to be around the dogs. I think it is important for the kids to do things to show alpha position (have the child make the dog sit or down, etc. for a treat, etc.) If Roxy jumps up after your daughter, give her a firm NO and make her sit or down (you may need help, such as your wife physically making Roxy do these things). You really will have to work with her on this. A good Obedience course or even a private trainer coming to teach the entire family how to work with Roxy would be a great thing.
'

Damn I'm a good reader! (been reading these forums for months now before getting bull type dog). Picking up many tips along the way.

My wife does feed her, not I. My wife only allows Roxy to jump in as she is getting up to work. But she waits until my wife tells her so. I just mentioned it as it made me feel good! I'm firm and she listens, so Rox's potential to learn is very good. I'm also patient and more then willing to wait for the correct behavior. I have spoken to a trainer already and I told my wife (yikes - telling my wife to do something doesn't happen often) that she'd be taking the training with Roxy (I'll also be there - but on the sideline). The trainer agreed and also suggested it as both my "girls" needs to work together. Doing so will scale my wife's leadership. First 3 courses are private, remaining ones a wth a small class (god I hope she behaves amongst other dogs.). I'm working tons with my daughter (as my son understood it WAY it faster).

My daughter being 4 and having gazillions of energy to spend needs to learn / condition her behavior around Roxy. But Roxy still needs to know her boundaries around my kids too. I'm just glad it's not jealousy... Work in progress, but I supervise both when playing (I'm not allowing Tug-of-wars for the moment) Roxy respond when told to backoff (or my wife) and I tell my daughter what she has done wrong to Roxy and have her try to correct her approach or to highlight what is considering teasing. Roxy likes my daughter alot, but when the excitment gets the best of my little 40-pounds daughter, we stop it. Funny how she doesn't reacts the same with my son. Probably because my daughter is a "in your face" type of person. Not probably, she is!

My wife definately needs to working more with her. That she and I understand. I expect Roxy and the kids to get along and have fun, nothing more. I've had other dogs in the past and I know for a fact that kids can give/teach basic commands to a dog, but dogs will most likely never see a kid as an authoritive figure.
 
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