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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been looking through the forums and have been wondering what people's thoughts are on structured group walks.
If you're not familiar with the idea, I'll give a brief description: my trainer runs a very successful dog group that meets on weekends for group walks. They are all on-leash (as per our local by-laws) and each person is responsible for maintaining control of their dog at all times. There are rules for the walk and in 9 years of running this group he has never had an incident or issue, because the people involved respect the rules.
My ideal would be for my dog/dogs to be rather indifferent to people and dogs we meet or pass on our walks, so I feel this type of activity would be a great training opportunity to enforce this behavior, once we have a good foundation of OB down. Thoughts? Opinions? Suggestions?


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I do not see an issue as long as each dog is leashed and under control.
I feel that your trainer would not allow an aggresive dog in with the group,
so that should reduce chances of any issues between the dogs. I think
for a dog of your age, it would be good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! I was hoping some of you more experienced owners would offer some thoughts. If I decide to join the walks I'll be sure to post some pictures!


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Our AB would ruin the trainer's record of no incidents. She only gets along with the JRT that she shares the house with and is unpredictable around all other dogs. I am not proud of her behavior ,but my attempts to change it have failed. If your dog will behave it could be a nice socialization tool. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't really think you can change their nature, but you love them no matter what.


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It depends on the individual dog as well. We used to take organized walks with a park ranger at our nature reserve. His dog was almost toy sized. My dog AmStaff but long and lean, a few boxers. I loved the boxers. They taught Sophie a new way to play and how to swim. It totally depends on the mix of pups.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It depends on the individual dog as well. We used to take organized walks with a park ranger at our nature reserve. His dog was almost toy sized. My dog AmStaff but long and lean, a few boxers. I loved the boxers. They taught Sophie a new way to play and how to swim. It totally depends on the mix of pups.
I agree Whiskers, it does depend on the mix, but not just of dogs, it depends on the people as well. These walks have everything from teacup Chihuahuas to Great Danes, and all things in between. The one thing the owners all have in common is a desire to be ambassadors for dog ownership. I attended a couple of walks in the fall before winter took over here in Newfoundland, and witnessed first hand the amazed looks and compliments of passersby who would turn a corner of a trail and see 40+ dogs walking quietly along in a group. There is no play time as such on the walks, but many of the dogs attend the same dog daycare.
 

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My AB would get expelled from doggy daycare and banned from the group walk!
If I ever get another bully, I will start very young to work on the socialization situation. Unfortunately the dog was adopted as an adult and her bad behavior was pretty much set in stone
The biggest problem is that she just seems to enjoy confrontation .
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The biggest problem is that she just seems to enjoy confrontation .

That trait is not confined to AB's lol. My first(and only) experience with dog parks was years ago when my family had a little beagle, and dog parks were still fairly new in my area. We were naive and thought it would be a great idea to let our little 30 lb beagle play with the other dogs. It didn't take long for an 80 lb black Lab to grab our little guy by the back of the neck and pin him to the ground. Far too quick for us to react or intervene, and it took two men to separate the dogs, neither one the owner of the Lab! Fortunately there was no physical injury to our dog, but it was the end of dog parks for me.
I have a few friends with dogs who enjoy hiking and as long as my dogs are civil with them, that's all I expect.


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Clara, my pit bull, would never make it in group play or dog parks. Maverick, the coyote mix
is introverted and likes being by himself. But my new dog/pup (9 months old) loves
group play. So I let him go once a week on Thursdays to a structured and monitored
group play to help him socialize and to wear him out a little. He has so much energy and
needs that type of workout. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Structured and monitored... I firmly believe that is the key. Letting dogs play in a free-for-all type atmosphere is, I think anyway, a recipe for disaster.
And you have a coyote mix? That must be interesting. Coyotes are new to Newfoundland, I don't know much about them.


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i dont see a problem with trying it and it sounds like it would be a good thing. you can always stop if there is a problem. sarah doesnt do walks or get along with other dogs so couldnt do that with her lol
 
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