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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
was sent this, i found it informative and it would seem epilepsy is the topic of the week/month

The facts about epilepsy:

If a parent dog is a carrier, then 37% of puppies will develop the condition.

One puppy out of four in a litter will not carry the gene. There is no way of telling which puppy this will be, there are no tests as yet that will highlight the gene free dog.

The other three puppies out of the four will either go on to develop the condition, or carry the gene and pass the condition to their offspring.

The condition is normally predominant in young males, but we have seen an increasing number of females developing full epilepsy.

Epileptic fits eventually can cause brain damage as the brain is starved of oxygen. A sweet natured dog may become aggressive a dog’s whole personality may change.

There is nothing to be done for a dog who is having a fit. Epileptic seizures are an over reactive response to an every day stimulation. The mere action of comforting your dog may in fact compound the situation. The dog’s jaws will lock down during a seizure, he has no control over this so cannot be blamed if your fingers are in the way. The dog will not have any control over any of his bodily functions, and may well be doubly incontinent.

Most dog owners will then clean the soiled area with a nice smelling detergent, the smell of this detergent can then launch another seizure.

As an owner you must darken the room and walk away, leaving the dog as quietly as possible. This is possibly the hardest thing you will ever have to do as a dog lover, second only to making the decision to have your beloved dog put to sleep to end his suffering. After the decision is made, you will then suffer months if not years of guilt, wondering if there was something else you could have done, wondering if you should have tried just one more time….

When your dog comes out of his seizure he will not know you, he will not know his surroundings, he will be confused, his vision will be blurred. You must then keep him safe from hurting himself – not easy with a large dog who wants to do something but does not know why.

THERE IS NO CURE. A dog may be treated, but this treatment is ongoing, and in the very few cases where a dog responds well to treatment the long term affects of the drugs can cause liver damage. As an owner of an epileptic dog, there is, unfortunately, not a lot to look forward to.

The one saving grace, if it can be called that, is the condition IS hereditary. Because of this fact we have been able to research, to isolate the lines from where it originates, and in doing so we minimise the chances of this illness being carried forward. This is unfortunately of no compensation to those who have already suffered the heartbreak of epilepsy, or indeed to those who have dogs who have yet to develop the condition.

The sad fact of the matter is that there are three kinds of breeders, the very worst are the ones who are breeding from epileptic dog, with the full knowledge of their condition, and for the sake of money and the fact that they have no conscience, the unscrupulous people are willing to actually sell that heartache.

The second category are the incompetent breeders, who may well have a lovely dog, and their wishes may in fact have nothing to do with money, but they either listen to the old fashioned “it is better for a ***** to have one litter” – which is an absolute old wives tale, or they may genuinely think they have a lovely dog and wish to breed for themselves and to sell a few! These people, although some are well meaning, I label as incompetent because the illness has been so highlighted, with every Corso information website offering just that, information, and these people have not taken the time or trouble to ask for that information and research their line as well as that of the potential stud dog, before jumping in and producing a litter of beautiful looking little time bombs.

There are absolutely no reasons in this age of technology for anyone to plead ignorant.

The third kind of breeder is the one which studies his lines for details of all hereditary illnesses, not just epilepsy. The breeder who can tell you exactly why he put his ***** to a certain dog, why he decided to breed from his ***** in the first place, and what measures he has taken to produce not only beautiful, but healthy puppies.
 

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My mom's old beagle had epilepsy. He had a seizure on the very first day we brought him home, and the BYB who sold him to us knew there was something wrong with him and did not disclose the information.

Poor guy - he would always try to get to us as the seizure was coming, and therefore he was always walking when it hit; his front legs would seize, and he would hit the floor chin first. We always held him throughout the seizure (luckily, incontinence was not one of his symptoms!), and for some time after. After the seizing stopped, it would take quite some time for him to come around and be in his mind again. We started giving him phenobarbitol when he was about six years old, which reduced the frequency of seizures considerably. Exhaustion is what set his off, as well as fleas, so we knew when one was imminent. Though infrequent, his seizures got longer in duration as he grew old, as did the recovery period.

We had to have his liver function tested monthly, because of the meds, but he never had any problem there. It was his poor little heart that finally gave out on him (had a murmur, probably also congenital). He lived to be 15 and a half. Sweetest dog ever. :(
 

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I have also done research and found the following information:

Fact: Congenital defects can be the cause for epilepsy, but this is not always the case.

The following issues also cause this disorder:

1) Blood glucose levels that are too high (e.g.; diabetes mellitus) or too low (hypoglycemia)

2) Low oxygen levels in the blood that could be caused by anemia, heart problems, or difficulties with breathing

3) Kidney disorders

4) Liver disorders

5) Infections such as canine distemper

6) Tumors

7) Toxins, like antifreeze, lead, or chocolate

8 ) Fevers and hyperthermia

9) Brain damage resulting from trauma or poor blood flow to the brain

10) Certain medications

11) Low calcium in females that are nursing young (eclampsia)

12) Primary or idiopathic epilepsy

source: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&cat=1828&articleid=433



With that being said, I myself (as I am not a breeder) am unaware as to how this gene is found in a carrier. I know that epilepsy is not linked to NCL, that has a completely different set of characteristics of it's own. I am curious how these tests can be done though for my own knowledge.

Also, if 37% of puppies will develop the condition, and in a specific litter where only 1 has developed it, is it safe to say that the sire/dam is not a carrier because the % is way off and statistics don't lie?

My last question, are you thus calling C a byb?? Just want to get the statements clear here as I also recall comments at the dog show this past winter ( yes I have spies everywhere ;) ) I am extremely concerned with the effects that slander may cause, not only from comments made by people on this open public forum, but in person as well. The reason I bring this up is due to the snowball effect which seems to have occured.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
you have "spies" nowhere, you only seem to know what "C" has told you. and no, at this time, i am not calling "C" a byb, those are your words.
there is no test for the epilepsy gene. altho work is being done at this time to separate the gene and develope a test.
hopefully in the very near future there will be a way to tell which dog carries the gene and which doesn't
 

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attitude said:
you have "spies" nowhere, you only seem to know what "C" has told you. and no, at this time, i am not calling "C" a byb, those are your words.
there is no test for the epilepsy gene. altho work is being done at this time to separate the gene and develope a test.
hopefully in the very near future there will be a way to tell which dog carries the gene and which doesn't
I was asking only because a friend of mine who lives in Toronto, who I meet up with to go on walks with Diablo and his dog, (and no it wasn't C as he was not at the show), over-heard one of your friends calling him a puppy miller while you were all together. Obviously it bothers me to hear such things. If you don't feel this way, that is fine and I do not want to hold you responsible for your friend's actions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
redbull said:
I was asking only because a friend of mine who lives in Toronto, who I meet up with to go on walks with Diablo and his dog, (and no it wasn't C as he was not at the show), over-heard one of your friends calling him a puppy miller while you were all together. Obviously it bothers me to hear such things. If you don't feel this way, that is fine and I do not want to hold you responsible for your friend's actions.
boy you sure do like to start trouble don't you evan? since i know this never happened i will simply assume that you are just trying to cause problems again.

redbull said:
If you don't feel this way, that is fine and I do not want to hold you responsible for your friend's actions.

well gee, isn't that big of you.
 

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Look, call me a f%^king liar, I don't care, I don't need this sh!t and there is no reason why I would want to start trouble...no motivation whatsoever...a good f&*king friend of mine died today and I don't need this crap...I've been nothing but nice to you on this board...goodbye
 

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I'm sorry you lost a friend and all, but to be honest, i do believe you have called Cathy names in the past.

Also, I was at the sportsman show, and Cathy's friend NEVER called Calvin a BYB. Your "spy" had asked if he was breeding, and all he said was "with Calvin having puppies why do I need to". Then the guy flipped out and tried to get Cathy's friend to fight with him. Got the story a little twisted.
 

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I know it says that epilepsy is genetic and there isn't any cure, but it can be brought on by physical factors. Our dog Spooky developed epilepsy and we were told by our vet at the time that she had to go on phenobarbital to keep it under control. After a couple years we realized it was related to her allergies and so when we started to understand her allergies and get them under control (strict diet, adding supplements, extra boosting of the immune system durring season changes, etc...) her seizures stopped and she was only on the phenobarbital for a year.
 

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redbull said:
I have also done research and found the following information:

Fact: Congenital defects can be the cause for epilepsy, but this is not always the case.

The following issues also cause this disorder:

1) Blood glucose levels that are too high (e.g.; diabetes mellitus) or too low (hypoglycemia)

2) Low oxygen levels in the blood that could be caused by anemia, heart problems, or difficulties with breathing

3) Kidney disorders

4) Liver disorders

5) Infections such as canine distemper

6) Tumors

7) Toxins, like antifreeze, lead, or chocolate

8 ) Fevers and hyperthermia

9) Brain damage resulting from trauma or poor blood flow to the brain

10) Certain medications

11) Low calcium in females that are nursing young (eclampsia)

12) Primary or idiopathic epilepsy

source: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&cat=1828&articleid=433
Would this actually be considered "epilepsy" or just a dog who had a seizure due to medical, environmental or health problems?
 

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facts about epilepsy

Hello Attitude,

I was very impressed with your post in this "thread". A lot of what you said really hit home. Could you please post the link that you are quoting the stats from?

I won't go into all of the details bec. I already wrote about our 23 mos old female american bulldog in another place in this forum. We had to put to Fergie to sleep recently because of severe grand mal seizures. Within 3 mos, even though she was on meds, her seizures had graduated to clusters - she really had no quaity of life in the last few days of her life.

Another very good site about canine diseases is www.caninegeneticdiseases.net I encourage everyone to support their canine research project as much as possible.

thanks,
holly
 
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