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I've noticed something interesting about Sam - she can be easily shamed when she's done something 'wrong'. For instance - yesterday she and the girls were running around in the yard (she was on a lead) and Taylor forgot and ran too close to Sam. Sam of course in her hyper frenzy jumped Taylor and clawed her. Before I said anything to her she immediatly fell down on her belly and started squirming and looking 'sorry'. Today she got in the garbage while she was outside (I forgot it was within her reach) and when I saw her happily munching away she got a panicked look on her face and when I said "SAM, NO" (in a tone of voice that conveyed dissapointment, not yelling) she immediatly got quiet and went staright to bed when we got inside. Just curious if this is paticularly common among this breed or is just a 'dog' thing in general and depends on temperment. Does anyone else use 'shame' (for lack of better word) and is it adviable or effective?
 

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I don't really think "shame" is the right word. I have the same reaction from my Jazzy when she's been naughty. She runs, cowers, etc. She's a nerve bag, hate to say it. I think it's all in the temperament.
 

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newpitowner said:
I've noticed something interesting about Sam - she can be easily shamed when she's done something 'wrong'. For instance - yesterday she and the girls were running around in the yard (she was on a lead) and Taylor forgot and ran too close to Sam. Sam of course in her hyper frenzy jumped Taylor and clawed her. Before I said anything to her she immediatly fell down on her belly and started squirming and looking 'sorry'. Today she got in the garbage while she was outside (I forgot it was within her reach) and when I saw her happily munching away she got a panicked look on her face and when I said "SAM, NO" (in a tone of voice that conveyed dissapointment, not yelling) she immediatly got quiet and went staright to bed when we got inside. Just curious if this is paticularly common among this breed or is just a 'dog' thing in general and depends on temperment. Does anyone else use 'shame' (for lack of better word) and is it adviable or effective?
I don't know if this is a general dog thing or not - because Mags is my first dog - but she does the same thing. She tends to pounce and jump and scratch me all the time - when she does and i gasp or say ouch - she immediately runs and hides under the table or desk and gets a sad look on her face. All I have to do is look at her and shake my finger no and her ears will go back and she will kinda shudder. She knows when she is naughty and she knows when I am not happy with her.
 

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Dogs are pretty much like people, some are more sensitive than others. Ben is as hard as they come. He is thick as can be, and getting in trouble doesn't even seem to phase him. You can get on to him one second, and the next second he si back to being a total goof, and completely forgot.
Maddie is totally different all you have to do is say her name in a stronger tone, or correct her for something then ~ poof belly up and pouting for a good while.
 

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I think some dogs just feel bad after they do something. Like they know it's wrong but they forget it is.
Then when they see you looking at them, they suddenly remember they aren't supposed to do that and
can feel the disapproval in their alpha. My pom does things bad all the time and the moment she sees me
looking at her she cowers up to me and kisses me uncontrollably, like sorry mom so sorry! LOL.
 

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The dog doesn't feel bad that he's done something wrong he's just responding to your 'agression' (your stance or your voice) with what are called 'calming signals'. Like another poster said; some dogs are more submissive than others. Calming signals included things like oblique glances, wide circing instead of approaching you, licking lips, rolling over and urination. Tuurid Rugaas has written some on this subject. Interestingly when people say, "he knew he'd done something wrong" they are just interpreting canine calming signals with a primate brain.

Paula
 

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Thanks Paula, that's what I meant but I said it wrong.
What else is new?
:p
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Very interesting - that makes far more sense. Thank you for clarifying.
 
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