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Any good advice for training a blind puppy? He is 7 weeks old and he is blind. I am wondering how to get him to do simple things such as walk on a leash, sit, speak etc. any good ideas? :?: :idea:
 

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I'm sorry I wish I could help. I think a member here LifeisDaPits has some experience with a sight and hearing impaired dog. I'll ask him to respond. I just wanted to say I'm happy that you love your dog so much, despite his/her problem!
 

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I would think you would train him the same as any other dog/puppy in those areas, but I am sure there are things you will need to train him on that is special to his needs. I agree with contacting "LifeisDaPits". He has had experence with other blind dogs. I am sure he would be happy to help you and he would be very knowledgable. Best of luck with your baby I read your other post about him and I too would not be able to give him back. Please stay with the forum and keep us updated on his progress. I think you will become very helpful to others since you will be gaining experences we never will unless we become owned by a blind pet/friend.
 

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in training a blind dog you need to rely on the other senses, hearing and scent. training, more or less, goes the same as beginner and basic for a sighted dog but you need more vocalization and the food needs to be directly in the dogs face. i had the opportunity to help a friend train a dog to, almost, a bh with a blind dog. i don't believe she ever trialed the dog but i am pretty sure she would have passed
 

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I would suggest clicker training. It works wonders for sighted dogs, and I think it should work well with your pups condition too.
 

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Here's a couple commands for you to work on. The sit and down command
the down command is usually "hard" for some dogs because they see it as being in a vulnerabile state, and sumbissive.

But I found it's best to ignore the behavior you don't want when teaching them commands, and rewarding them for behavior you want.

But here's some commands for you to try, and work on. I've used these with blind dogs before, and saw good results. But I also suggest contacting a professional trainer who can better assist you in this area.

Teaching the "Slow" Command

Steps:
1. Use this command to alert your dog that she's about to bump into something.

2. Put your dog on a leash.

3. Apply gentle pressure to the leash (avoid jerking) when your dog begins to walk.

4. Give the command "Slo-o-w" or "E-e-easy" at the same time.

5. Say "Yes" to your dog the instant she slows down.

6. Give your dog a food treat and lots of praise.

Teaching the "Wait" Command

Steps:
1. Use this command if your dog is in a dangerous situation, such as when you encounter terrain changes during a walk, or when you open the front door to go out, cross a street, or get out of your car.

2. Put your dog on a leash.

3. Give the command "Wait" ("Wa-a-ait") while applying steady and gentle pressure on the leash until the dog stops.

4. Say "Yes" when your pet stops, and give a food treat and praise.

5. Release your dog from this command before allowing her to move on. To do this, use the command "OK" in a bright, reassuring tone.

Warnings:
Do not teach the "slow" and "wait" commands together. Make sure your dog knows the "slow" command first.

Teaching the "Sit" and "Down" Commands

Steps:
1. Give the command "Sit."

2. Place a tasty-smelling food treat right next to your dog's nose and mouth at the same time.

3. Keep the food treat close to your dog's nose and slowly take the treat up and over its head. Doing this will lead your dog into a sit.

4. Say "Yes" the instant your dog sits, and give her a food treat and praise.

5. Start your "Down" command by first giving your dog the "Sit" command.

6. Hold a food treat close to your pet's nose, then give the command "Down."

7. Take the treat slowly down to the ground between your dog's legs. This should lead your dog into the down position.

8. Say "Yes" when the trick is accomplished, and give your dog treats and praise.

Tips:
When teaching "sit" and "down," hold onto the food treat while your dog nibbles to lure her into position.

"Down" is a difficult command to teach because it is a position of vulnerability for the dog. Be patient and try this over and over until you both get it right.


Overall Warnings:
Avoid getting angry, jerking, hitting or pushing your dog. Instead, ignore any behavior you don't want and reward the behavior you do want.

Teach new behaviors on a surface where your dog feels secure (a nonslip rug, for instance) and in a familiar area, such as the house.
 

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I would suggest clicker training. It works wonders for sighted dogs, and I think it should work well with your pups condition too.
I totally agree with Beetle. I have used this with Yemi and it's brilliant, she is sighted but I think it would be really good for a blind dog.

You would just replace LifeIsDaPits yes with a click Paula on here explained how it works for me and it really was good.

Please let us know how your training goes
 
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