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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All dogs have what's been labled an "oppositional reflex". We don't have it, so sometimes when people train dogs they don't realize that they are sometimes "mis-training".

If you pull a dog with a leash, it's natural for him to pull in the opposite direction. Reason why some dogs drag their owners when they are walked. Feeling the pull backwards will make the dog pull foward harder. While others "slam on the breaks" when they stay behind and are pulled forward.

With this in mind, I've always trained my dog to recall with some type of opposition toward me. I would have someone hold the leash while I go away from the dog. I'll have his favorite motivation (ball, tug, food, toy, etc.) with me and after an euforic petting and praising, I'll show it to him and entice him to get it. Then I'll sprint away from him shouting his name.

Once away, I'll turn around, facing him and say "X, come!!!" It is at this time that the person holding the leash will bring the dog to me. Depending on how the dog is returning, the person will either jog or run. The main thing is to make the dog "work" or "grind it out". Make him dig in to get to you.
reaT
Eventually, once the dog gets more proficient, the person holding the dog can let the leash go. This way the dog learns to RUN to you. Distance is a very important factor also. The closer you are to your dog, the slower he'll go to you. That's why when training this excercise you should try to get spacious place for it.

Another thing I do to help increase the speed and to entice the dog to WANT to recall to me faster is to turn around after I've called him and run "away" from the dog as he's coming to me. This will usually create a feeling of urgency in the dog in getting to you, resulting in an increae in speed. Then I would turn again to finish the recall.

And let me tell you ..... there was no better feeling when I competed in obedience than to hear the round of applause my dog got from the spectators after doing a running recall (or drop on recall in CDX) in a competition. I hope this helps. Happy training.
 

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I have never heard that before thank you for your time !!!!
 

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I've also never heard this, but it makes good sense to me. Getting your dog to come when called, and getting him there FAST are two different things.

Recently on a walk, Harley's collar broke when she strained to see another dog :shock: Thinking quick, I turned and RAN as fast as I could the other way. When I called her and she saw me running away, she was at my heel double quick. I seriously doubt she would have come otherwise, the other dog was too interesting.
 

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So, Nelson, is this kind of like the "frustrated recall"?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi all,

Thank you for your appreciation. My approach to dog training has been to have the dog WANT to do the command as opposed to him HAVING to do the command.

When you have a dog who eagerly wants to execute the commands, they are more clear headed and handle stress much better. I remember a CDX trial where my dog went over the hurdle to get the dumble yet he never took it. He kept running around until he saw the Akitas in the adyacent ring doing their show runs. It was then that he took his interest and jumped the fence. There was a loud scream "Pit Bull loose!" and everyone was scambling to get their dogs.

I shouted "Drago heeeeel". And came as straight as an arrow to me. Everyone else in the dog show tried to find the "loose dog" without realizing he was next to me! LOL. I was steaming mad at him for flunking until an obedience judge told me he was well trained. Puzzled I said "yeah right!", but he answered that because I was mad I didn't realize just what a good response my dog did. He went on to saying that only a well trained dog would respond in mid air to a recall command when going to a distraction like that. He said you called your dog while he was jumping over the fence and as soon as he heard my voice he never looked elsewhere. Usually dogs look down at where they are landing and he didn't even do that! Well, needless to say that his words made me look at the whole the situation differently. Eventually I learned that I had overtrained him and that's why he acted that way. So a loss is not a loss as long as you learn from it. :D take care guys, and happy training!
 

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Nelson:

I liked your idea and decided to try it out today at my own training class. The particular class today I tried it at was my "Mighty Mite" class where all dogs are small breed.

I have to tell you and anyone else reading this post that IT WORKED GREAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

WHAT A WONDERFUL IDEA!!! I can't wait to give it a try this week at my "Bully Breed" Class!!

THANKS SO MUCH!!!

Sue
 

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Nelson is the man!

This board is extremely lucky to have Mr. Nelson Rodriguez posting here. He is one of the "1986 original Ringers" in French Ring Sport. He has competed at the National level of competitive obedience. His resume is far to long to post here! He will be the personal protection and obedience judge at the WPBTCA Nationals this fall in Acton Maine.

I have known Nelson for many years and can tell you his greatest quality is his ability to teach. Most trainers do not have the natural patience and understanding that he has when teaching. I can tell you that if you ever get the opportunity to work with him...TAKE IT!

Safe training,
Chris Fraize
 

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Re: Nelson is the man!

Chris Fraize said:
This board is extremely lucky to have Mr. Nelson Rodriguez posting here. He is one of the "1986 original Ringers" in French Ring Sport. He has competed at the National level of competitive obedience. His resume is far to long to post here! He will be the personal protection and obedience judge at the WPBTCA Nationals this fall in Acton Maine.

I have known Nelson for many years and can tell you his greatest quality is his ability to teach. Most trainers do not have the natural patience and understanding that he has when teaching. I can tell you that if you ever get the opportunity to work with him...TAKE IT!

Safe training,
Chris Fraize
Well, I don't know what you call the opposite of a pot calling a kettle black, but that's high praise from you! Good to see you're still around. :wink:
 
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