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I don't know if therapy dogs are considered "working dogs" so I posted this here.

I think with Nala's sweet, gentle disposition, she would make a great therapy dog. (Hopefully she stays that way.)

There are 2 programs in my area. One is with MY hospital where I work now, called "Prescription: Dog Love." A little about the program from my hospital's website: http://www.summahealth.org/common/templates/contentindex.asp?ID=502

The Prescription: Dog Love program was created in 1993 to offer an uplifting experience for patients and provide alternative patient therapies. The program exposes staff and visitors to the benefits of interactions between people and animals using specially trained therapy dogs. The dogs visit particular units at Akron City and St. Thomas hospitals three to four times a week. Numerous studies have shown the presence of animals can aid in a patient's recovery by lowering blood pressure, easing depression and relieving pain. Prescription: Dog Love is the first established dog-visitation program of its kind at an adult hospital in Northeast Ohio.
Where I live, we have hospitals for adults only (where I work) and we also have a Children's Hospital that has this therapy dog program as well. This is taken from their website: https://www.akronchildrens.org/cms/site/f36aa217cedc4097/

Akron Children’s Hospital isn’t going to the dogs -- the dogs come to us! Since 1992, Children’s Doggie Brigade has brought joy and comfort to sick kids. All dogs undergo a veterinary exam and a behavioral screening process to ensure their suitability for the program. Once accepted into the Brigade, both dogs and owners alike earn volunteer credit for their weekly or biweekly visits to the hospital.

Each week, members of Children’s Child Life staff write up a list of patients whose doctors have OK’d a dog visit. Now some 60 canines strong, these four-legged volunteers tour the hallways, visit patients in their rooms, and stop in the activity rooms to see children who are well enough to be out of bed.
Nala won't be ready, of course, until she's an adult. But I am going to start training her now. She will get all her basics and obedience down, then I may have her evaluated by a therapy dog trainer, and go from there. All on a volunteer basis of course. I think it would be great to do in my spare time. Nala would steal all their hearts, I'm sure of it. I look forward to seeing the smiles of the sick children and hope it will lessen their suffering somehow. I always wanted to be a pediatric nurse, but found it too painful to watch. At least this way, I can still make a difference!
 
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