Bulldog Breeds Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone I am new here to this forum. I actually just recently bought a red nosed pitbull puppie at a private breeder.... was told he was healthy... seemed healthy when i checked enm out...
but i come to find he is blind. Run into walls, chairs, glass doors, etc. Called the lady back and she says.. i must have let em fall down the steps. (she has no vet records) so i take carter to the vet.. and she says its a congenial blindess... not due to trauma (duh) and that he otherwise seems healthy.
we had him there before he had even been in my possession for 24 hours. We came home, and all of a sudden now he is pissing blood. SO, i take em back again... he has a urinary traqct infection and i had to buy meds for em.
so this lady sold me this puppy (whom i am coming to adore) knowing he had problems... and now says she canb't refund any of my money bc its gone. :shock:
Yeah i was pissed.


Carter follows my voice and is getting around "ok".. still rams into everything. He is eating well, still peeing blood though. He follows my 6 mo old pug around outside and she kind of herds him into the yard when he tries to wander off.

Guess my question would be, anyone else here have a pit who has been blind since puppyhood? Or have one that is now blind and has some tips for me on the dos and don't with a "specail needs" dog?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,976 Posts
I have not had a dog blind since birth, but I have had a dog to be blind. She got along famously.
No one ever knew she was blind except when she would jump up on the couch into your plate of food. :lol: They learn quickly where everything is and manuver around things as if they can see it. All their other senses sharpen even more than they already are. The only thing you do not want to do, is to move your furniture around alot. Too confusing for them.

I am so sorry that you had to learn this way about back yard breeders. So sad for the pups that are born in this manner.
 
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah you are exactly right.. moving furniture would be BAD news for the little guy. ( it will take discipline bc i move mine normally one every few months haha) He sure is a doll tho. At first i was pissed and wanted a refund.. now im not even pushing the private breeder puppy lemon law ( i just found exists). To me I have grown attaced.. and just want him to have a good home now. My pug loves her play mate too.

Also, for those who may wonder : How did u not know he was blind....

well as the vet even said.. he knew his surrondings... so he wasnt flying into walls when i saw em. When i spoke to him he walked over to me and he made it to his food and all around the room. I had no clue till he came here and i was talking and he ran to me..... well.. to the entertainment center next to me. :cry:

walking on a leash tho, i fear willbe tricky... he's a timid little man

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,746 Posts
So are you going to give him a chance? If not, you know where he will end up!

Poor baby, this will be somewhat of a challenge, however not impossible.

Not pitbulls, but I do have a family member with a blind dog since puppyhood, and he does well. When I didnt know and went to visit them, he came in the room all happy, and walked into the wall!!! I was like"OMG!"They were like"Yeah, he is blind" AWWWWWWWWWWWWWEEEE!!!

I suppose the y learn their surrounding very quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
I don't know much about puppy lemon laws, but they should be able to help you out somehow.
If it were me, I would take her to court and report her to the ASPCA (they will help you if you ask).

What, may I ask, is a private breeder?
:?
 
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
All this is true.. we did speak with someone regarding the whole situation.....

but if we do that.. now we would have to return the puppy, and i dunno if at this point i can do that..... and i took her out of a lady's house that was pretty gross. See I thought he was healthy and i was rescuing her from there to a normal home.... little did i know just how true that really was :roll:

Thats what I get when i buy a dog from the "ghetto" in our area....
i learned my lesson....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,846 Posts
That's unfortunate. I hope you stick with him because it'll get easier as he gets older and used to his condition. My neighbor has a pit/lab that went blind at about 6 years old. She gets around the yard and house just fine, but I do see her stumble occassionally. It drives me nuts when they put all sorts of crap in her walkway and I see her trip over the obstacle course they've created. They've got so much crap in their yard and they're always changing it around.

I've seen small claims court cases on tv (like peoples court stuff), and they never award the plaintiff the purchase price of the dog unless they're willing to give the dog back. It has to do with the laws of unjust inrichment. They won't award your money back for the dog and let you keep the dog. However, I think that maybe you could recover something for vet bills and maybe punitive damages. Did you get a health guarantee from the breeder?

Any chance you could post some photos of the little guy???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Oh good luck with your little pup! If he was able to negotiate the breeder's home, maybe he will figure out how to negotiate your home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,279 Posts
You need to PM LIfeisthepits cause he dealt with blind dogs before and could give you information that you may want or need.I hope you keep the pup.a lot of training but it will be well worth it int he end.I am guessing you bought from a BYB and this is normally what happens, a ton of health issues which is sad but it happens.Good luck with you and your new pup
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,789 Posts
Do you have any other dogs? Just kinda curious cause some dogs who have "special needs" tend to bond strongly to another dog to help them get around.

My friend has a blind and deaf Great Dane, they adopted him from a rescue and he has turned out to be a great dog. He responds well to touch commands, though it took them awhile to fully train him the time it took was worth it.

Most people wonder how he gets around because he can't see or hear, but after being in his home for awhile he adapted to his surroundings and he can move all through the house without knocking anything over. He even climbs on and off the couch with no problems.

Training a dog with a disability isn't as hard as some people may think it is, and most blind dogs respond well to touch commands. A touch on the shoulder for a down, or a touch on the butt for a sit command.

Heres two articles for you to read.
Dogs that are partially or completely blind need owners who can help them cope with their daily lives. With a few minor adjustments to your home, your dog will get around with confidence.


Steps:
1. Remove dangerous obstacles (such as toys or pulled-out chairs) in your dog's normal walking path, especially if she has recently lost her vision.

2. Lay down tactile pathways for the dog in strategic places - for example, between her bed and the back door. Use carpet runners on wood or tile floors and rubber mats on carpeted areas.

3. Apply several drops of oil-based perfumes or fragrant oils to obstacles you want your dog to avoid - doorjambs, chairs, corners of coffee tables and walls.

4. Apply a new scent to any new piece of furniture that you add to your home.

5. Use high-contrast markings to help dogs with low vision avoid obstacles. Use black electrical tape on white doorjambs or white masking tape on dark stairs.

6. Introduce your dog to her new environment on a leash.

Tips:
Dogs may be afraid of rubber or plastic mats, so introduce them slowly (never forcefully) and offer food treats if appropriate for your dog's health. Practice with your dog on a leash if necessary.

Reapply oil-based scents weekly, but once your dog has developed a mental map of the house and yard, you might not need them. Scent options include prepared air fresheners, body deodorants and furniture polish.

Have your dog's eyes examined by a veterinary ophthalmologist. Certain forms of blindness can be corrected or improved through medication and/or surgery.


By teaching a blind dog the "go slowly" command, you may be able to help her avoid nasty bumps, build confidence and resume daily activities.


Steps:
1. Put your dog on a leash with a flat buckle collar, never a choke collar.

2. Apply gentle backward pressure on the leash (avoid jerking) when your dog begins to walk. Give the command "slo-o-w" or "e-e-easy" at the same time.

3. Say "good slow" or "good easy" to your dog the instant she slows down.

4. Give your dog a food treat and/or lots of praise.

5. Use this command to alert your dog whenever she's about to bump into something.

Tips:
Teach new behaviors on a surface where your dog feels secure (a non-slip rug, for instance) and in a familiar area.


Warnings:
Do not try to shove or startle your dog into going slowly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
Did you sign a contract when you purchased him?

There might be something in it that means you can get some reimbursement of vet fees.

We bought Patch from a store (i know, i know...) and in the contract it said that if we take him for his initial consultation at the vet and there's some health problem that wasn't picked up by the pet store we have choices... we can get a refund, or if we want to keep the dog they will pay for medical fees to fix the problem.

We found out Patch had a hernia.. and the pet place didn't know this when they sold him to us.

So i got a quote from the vet on how much it costs to have the hernia operation and i took this to the pet store and told them we'll give him the operation when we get him neutered so it will cost less (one anaesthetic) so they happily refunded the amount it would cost for the hernia operation!!!!!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,788 Posts
PitBullRoyalty said:
I don't know much about puppy lemon laws, but they should be able to help you out somehow.
If it were me, I would take her to court and report her to the ASPCA (they will help you if you ask).

What, may I ask, is a private breeder?
:?
Yeah - call the better business bureau, maybe they will have advice. Depending on how much you paid (if more than $50 or 100.00) it might be worth it to take the person to court.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,976 Posts
Patch said:
Did you sign a contract when you purchased him?

There might be something in it that means you can get some reimbursement of vet fees.

We bought Patch from a store (i know, i know...) and in the contract it said that if we take him for his initial consultation at the vet and there's some health problem that wasn't picked up by the pet store we have choices... we can get a refund, or if we want to keep the dog they will pay for medical fees to fix the problem.

We found out Patch had a hernia.. and the pet place didn't know this when they sold him to us.

So i got a quote from the vet on how much it costs to have the hernia operation and i took this to the pet store and told them we'll give him the operation when we get him neutered so it will cost less (one anaesthetic) so they happily refunded the amount it would cost for the hernia operation!!!!!!!!!
Hey, do not want to steal a thread but wanted to see how patch is doing?
Is he still digging holes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
Thanks for asking Gazar.
Yep, patch is still digging.... not as much as he used to though.
he's chewing more these days!

The yard is pretty much ruined... it's dirt...
so we're getting most of it paved.
only problem now is the guy who was supposed to do the paving this weekend hasn't returned my calls so i've had to cancel the delivery of all the pavers and 4.5 tonnes of sand... it's been a total nightmare!
typical tradesman!

all this for our darling little PATCH! the terror!

lately he's been a little disobedient though.

i almost cried at training yesterday...... he keeps tugging at the lead, so i bought him a head halter, and he was doing ok on it.
but the trainer we had yesterday told me not to use it... so he was back to being a little sh1t.
and all he wants to do is play and hump all the other dogs... i mean, i can handle that...
but at home now he just wants to do whatever he wants and im scared he's moving back a few steps!

before, when we used to say no, he'd listen!
now... he just tries and tries again and again!

i blame my husband for not being consistent! it's SO frustrating!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,976 Posts
Patch said:
Thanks for asking Gazar.
Yep, patch is still digging.... not as much as he used to though.
he's chewing more these days!

The yard is pretty much ruined... it's dirt...
so we're getting most of it paved.
only problem now is the guy who was supposed to do the paving this weekend hasn't returned my calls so i've had to cancel the delivery of all the pavers and 4.5 tonnes of sand... it's been a total nightmare!
typical tradesman!

all this for our darling little PATCH! the terror!

lately he's been a little disobedient though.

i almost cried at training yesterday...... he keeps tugging at the lead, so i bought him a head halter, and he was doing ok on it.
but the trainer we had yesterday told me not to use it... so he was back to being a little sh1t.
and all he wants to do is play and hump all the other dogs... i mean, i can handle that...
but at home now he just wants to do whatever he wants and im scared he's moving back a few steps!

before, when we used to say no, he'd listen!
now... he just tries and tries again and again!

i blame my husband for not being consistent! it's SO frustrating!

There was a really nice thread on here about leash training and now I cannot find it.
Why don't you post a tread on this. There is alot of info that can help. Pat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
LifeIsDaPits said:
Do you have any other dogs? Just kinda curious cause some dogs who have "special needs" tend to bond strongly to another dog to help them get around.

My friend has a blind and deaf Great Dane, they adopted him from a rescue and he has turned out to be a great dog. He responds well to touch commands, though it took them awhile to fully train him the time it took was worth it.

Most people wonder how he gets around because he can't see or hear, but after being in his home for awhile he adapted to his surroundings and he can move all through the house without knocking anything over. He even climbs on and off the couch with no problems.

Training a dog with a disability isn't as hard as some people may think it is, and most blind dogs respond well to touch commands. A touch on the shoulder for a down, or a touch on the butt for a sit command.

Heres two articles for you to read.
Dogs that are partially or completely blind need owners who can help them cope with their daily lives. With a few minor adjustments to your home, your dog will get around with confidence.


Steps:
1. Remove dangerous obstacles (such as toys or pulled-out chairs) in your dog's normal walking path, especially if she has recently lost her vision.

2. Lay down tactile pathways for the dog in strategic places - for example, between her bed and the back door. Use carpet runners on wood or tile floors and rubber mats on carpeted areas.

3. Apply several drops of oil-based perfumes or fragrant oils to obstacles you want your dog to avoid - doorjambs, chairs, corners of coffee tables and walls.

4. Apply a new scent to any new piece of furniture that you add to your home.

5. Use high-contrast markings to help dogs with low vision avoid obstacles. Use black electrical tape on white doorjambs or white masking tape on dark stairs.

6. Introduce your dog to her new environment on a leash.

Tips:
Dogs may be afraid of rubber or plastic mats, so introduce them slowly (never forcefully) and offer food treats if appropriate for your dog's health. Practice with your dog on a leash if necessary.

Reapply oil-based scents weekly, but once your dog has developed a mental map of the house and yard, you might not need them. Scent options include prepared air fresheners, body deodorants and furniture polish.

Have your dog's eyes examined by a veterinary ophthalmologist. Certain forms of blindness can be corrected or improved through medication and/or surgery.


By teaching a blind dog the "go slowly" command, you may be able to help her avoid nasty bumps, build confidence and resume daily activities.


Steps:
1. Put your dog on a leash with a flat buckle collar, never a choke collar.

2. Apply gentle backward pressure on the leash (avoid jerking) when your dog begins to walk. Give the command "slo-o-w" or "e-e-easy" at the same time.

3. Say "good slow" or "good easy" to your dog the instant she slows down.

4. Give your dog a food treat and/or lots of praise.

5. Use this command to alert your dog whenever she's about to bump into something.

Tips:
Teach new behaviors on a surface where your dog feels secure (a non-slip rug, for instance) and in a familiar area.


Warnings:
Do not try to shove or startle your dog into going slowly.
This is a great article. Sent this my cousin a while ago after his dog lost her vision due to Diabetes. My cuz used a lot of these techniques and said he saw a huge difference. He even just rubbed a little lemon on the door jams and that helped the dog find her way. (Only if they are white, it can take color out of paint)

Biggest suggestion I have is not to get complacent. The dog was doing so great at home, it was almost like she had her vision again. Going to someone else's house was a different story. The poor thing fell down basement stairs at my parents house, my dad caught her, but she got scared and growled and snapped at my dad. (Something she had never dome in 12 years.) She also did lots of bumping into stuff and had some accidents because she could not find the door. After that he would rub a little lemon on the door at other peoples houses to help the dog find her way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
This might help with bumping into things.
The web site does say the orders are backed up by a month, but some one could make a temporary halo and attach it to a regular harness that way as the puppy grows you would only need one and just change the halo to the larger harness.
I don't know if that would work but it might be worth a try.

http://angelvest.homestead.com/description.html
http://angelvest.homestead.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
Just wanted to say that posts like this one is the reason why I enjoy this forum. The feeling of support, help, learning and information sharing with people who have similar interests. There have been some posters recently that seem to only want to be argumentative, combative and negative and I think that really reduces the quality of the forum, even if they are knowledgeable. Glad to see that we are all heading back in the right direction! =D> :thumbright:
 
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I agree! Thank you so much to all who have had great advice and what not. Like i said i am at a loss sometimes what to do. I love the little guy tho. What a sweetie. Pics to come soon i promise ! :D
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top